Discussion of the UK Government
:sunglasses: 49.3 % ❤ 3.5 % :thumbsup: 9.1 % 😯 3.5 % :grinning: 25.1 % 🧥 1.2 % 🙏 1.1 % 😟 4.1 % :cry: 2.9 % :shit: 0.2 %
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By Kreuzberger
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#620125
davidjay wrote:
Mon Aug 10, 2020 8:27 pm
I was half-watching that while eating dinner and towards the end it was one "Did she really say that?" after another.
"Emails from constituents", she mentioned. "The UK is so tolerant but we don't want to..." , she hinted at.

She didn't elaborate.

You don't need to be Turing to decode the hint to that bundle of criminality which she digests with her quail's eggs of a misty morn.
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#620151
Johnson almost has a gung-ho obsession with getting kids back to school rather than exploring cautious compromises. Would it be cynical to suggest he and Cummings crave a dust up with the teaching unions because they can’t function without an ‘other’? A theme explored in this spot on article from ex-MEP Clare Moody
Johnson and Cummings are desperate for Labour to oppose their plan of ending the transition by 31 December 2020. They want to define themselves against an enemy as a way of portraying themselves as insurgents, as the voice of the people against a Westminster elite or the establishment – and they want to put Labour firmly into the ‘elite’ category: they always describe Keir as ‘Sir Keir Starmer’ and wanted to use his background as a lawyer for this purpose – until they realised the public see that as a plus rather than a minus. https://westenglandbylines.co.uk/brexit ... -shirk-it/
 
By Malcolm Armsteen
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#620157
Exactly so. And both Gove and Comeings have considerable previous with the teachers - unions or otherwise. Teachers press all their buttons - it's the bullies getting back at the clever kids. As it is for so much of their voters.
youngian, Andy McDandy, Oblomov and 1 others liked this
 
By davidjay
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#620158
Kreuzberger wrote:
Mon Aug 10, 2020 9:06 pm
davidjay wrote:
Mon Aug 10, 2020 8:27 pm
I was half-watching that while eating dinner and towards the end it was one "Did she really say that?" after another.
"Emails from constituents", she mentioned. "The UK is so tolerant but we don't want to..." , she hinted at.

She didn't elaborate.

You don't need to be Turing to decode the hint to that bundle of criminality which she digests with her quail's eggs of a misty morn.
It's possibly the oldest "I'm not a racist but" of the lot: "We are a tolerant nation but you can only push us so far..."
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#620160
It's possibly the oldest "I'm not a racist but" of the lot: "We are a tolerant nation but you can only push us so far..."

I regret having to wince and feel angry at the impressive Kindertransport statue outside Liverpool Street Station. The idea that Britain was generous and warmly welcomed Jewish refugees fleeing the Nazis is a smug myth.
Tubby Isaacs liked this
 
By Andy McDandy
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#620161
Malcolm Armsteen wrote:
Tue Aug 11, 2020 10:03 am
Exactly so. And both Gove and Comeings have considerable previous with the teachers - unions or otherwise. Teachers press all their buttons - it's the bullies getting back at the clever kids. As it is for so much of their voters.
See previous comments on their obsession with winning - seeing life as a series of 2 party confrontations, where winning is defined by the other side losing. So if you rubbish an opponent, or make them look foolish, you win by default, and don't have to offer up anything yourself.

It's the equivalent of the classroom bully tripping up Specky McPastry as he heads to the front of the class for his recital. Bully gets a laugh, McPastry has no comeback.
 
By oboogie
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#620168
Bashing teachers is extremely popular.

1. Virtually everybody went to school and almost all of them carry a childhood scar from that experience, a festering resentment of a perceived wrong - real or imagined.

2. Add to that the adult jealousy that teachers are a bunch of slackers - 9.00 - 3.30pm, half the year off on holiday and early retirement on gold plated pensions.

3. Plus, it's well known that, even when they are there, they don't do any real work, it's just glorified babysitting done by people who couldn't hack a proper job. Innit thou'.
 
By Malcolm Armsteen
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#620170
Them that can do...

Absolutely, Winston. Look at that vein of resentment that Comeings and Gove tapped into when at the DfE - remember the 'blob' and how well that was received, certainly by elements of the press? (Mostly resentful because they could never smartarse their way past some teacher).

Look on any school Facebook page for the snide comments from parents who didn't get personal treatment for their kids during lockdown, from those who were told off at school for being arseholes or bullies, or those who simply sat at the back picking their noses and now realise it was the kids who did some work who have the best jobs.
oboogie liked this
 
By Oblomov
Posts
#620171
youngian wrote:
Tue Aug 11, 2020 9:42 am
Johnson almost has a gung-ho obsession with getting kids back to school rather than exploring cautious compromises. Would it be cynical to suggest he and Cummings crave a dust up with the teaching unions because they can’t function without an ‘other’? A theme explored in this spot on article from ex-MEP Clare Moody
Johnson and Cummings are desperate for Labour to oppose their plan of ending the transition by 31 December 2020. They want to define themselves against an enemy as a way of portraying themselves as insurgents, as the voice of the people against a Westminster elite or the establishment – and they want to put Labour firmly into the ‘elite’ category: they always describe Keir as ‘Sir Keir Starmer’ and wanted to use his background as a lawyer for this purpose – until they realised the public see that as a plus rather than a minus. https://westenglandbylines.co.uk/brexit ... -shirk-it/
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... n-cummings
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#620176
One of the founding propositions of 20th-century mass democracy has been that government should act not for the few, but for everyone. Inherent within this idea is a concept of “the public interest”, or “the common good”. We might not be sure what that is – and we certainly won’t be able to agree on it. But in a democracy, so the argument goes, we can come together politically and our representatives will broker a settlement between the competing interests of various social, economic and political groups.

Demagogues do have a concept of the public interest and national consensus when they’re up shit’s creek. Hence get behind Brexit and make the best of it. Its very generous of Starmer to sit back and not want to share the credit.
 
By Tubby Isaacs
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#620182
Malcolm Armsteen wrote:
Tue Aug 11, 2020 11:42 am
Them that can do...

Absolutely, Winston. Look at that vein of resentment that Comeings and Gove tapped into when at the DfE - remember the 'blob' and how well that was received, certainly by elements of the press?
Gove had to be moved out of the DfE because the public didn't like his schtick. Doubtless, some of it is personal, but not all that much of it, or else Gove couldn't have been the effective number 2 in the Brexit referendum. There's a significant chunk of the electorate who were happy to hear Gove slag off the EU, but not so happy to hear him slagging off teachers.
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