Discussion of the UK Government
:sunglasses: 45.2 % ❤ 2.6 % :thumbsup: 12.9 % 😯 4.9 % :grinning: 23.9 % 🧥 1.5 % 🙏 2.1 % 😟 0.8 % :cry: 5.7 % :shit: 0.5 %
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
 
By Tubby Isaacs
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#619676
Nick Boles, who's no lefty but an intelligent man, was appointed by Cameron to overhaul planning. He didn't get very far- lots of the Tory base are strongly opposed to more development, and the Telegraph campaigned strongly against.. You can imagine Lib Dems running Lord Rennard-style campaigns and picking up a lot of council seats and maybe the odd Westminster one if the Tories do it now.
#619677
davidjay wrote:
Thu Aug 06, 2020 12:37 pm
But like unemployment in the eighties it still won't affect that many people. There night be three million unemployed, with maybe another six or seven million affected, but there's still five times that many who will be unaffected, so for them the government is absolutely wonderful and it's the workshy claimants who are the problem.
There are some fairly big differences though:
1. Unemployment in the 1980s was a lot to do with the slow decline of manufacture and heavy industries that realistically people knew had a finite lifespan (debate about the shitty manner this was handled in by Thatcher notwithstanding). Today though, we have whole sectors of the economy shutting down practically overnight that would be *entirely* viable if coronavirus hadn't happened, or if not shut then left facing such drastic changes only the largest will survive - and even then with heavy cuts.
2. There won't be anyone unaffected because unemployment is a side show to the main problems of coronavirus and brexit - it's not happening in a vacuum. Unemployment figures will go hand in hand with death rates, brexit red tape, supply shortages, increasing evidence of government corruption etc.
3. The visibility of the unemployment is much higher because it affects *everywhere*, not just locations built up around the sectors that got killed off in the 1980s. Mr and Mrs Bloggs in Kent in 1982 probably struggled to empathise if a coal mine in Northumberland shut and killed the town it was in because they're not going to go down the pit themselves, don't live there, and were never likely to visit or move there. The 2020 Mr and Mrs Bloggs will absolutely notice if their local theatre, cafe, restaurant, pub and childminder go to the wall and their kids can't get summer jobs or get into college because their grades were depressed, or if they lose money because Mr Bloggs' import business is strangled by brexit red tape etc. There's no escaping this one unless you're super-rich.
4. The government we have now are uniquely useless. Thatcher and her govt. lacked empathy and made awful, cold choices, but you couldn't truly argue they were *incompetent*, and corruption was still a resigning matter. Almost none of the current cabinet would last a week in Thatcher's cabinet, either from ineptitude, inability or greed.

Johnson loves to divide and play us vs them - it's how he won Brexit and how he's staggered on so far. But he's running out of thems and he's making it so there are fewer and fewer uss. When it's just the Tories pinning this on the young, old, unemployed, employed not going to work in the right place, NHS, Care homes, scientists, experts, minority groups, protestors going out, people shielding too long staying in, remainers, brexiters who want a deal etc. etc. then who is left? The penny will drop once everyone has had their go in the blame spotlight.
Last edited by crabcakes_windermere on Thu Aug 06, 2020 3:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#619679
The only good thing might be that whoever follows Johnson might have to do so on a platform of getting people to "invest in Britain" and "cutting red tape" by signing up to the EFTA or something and presenting it as a win once all the disaster capitalists have made their initial brexit bonanza and now see trade barriers as impediments to their god-given right to earn ever more cash. But it'll be a really fucking hard few years until then.
 
By davidjay
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#619684
Much as I hope crabcakes is right, the pessimist in me believes that Johnson has tapped into the xenophobic, bigoted, mean-spirited, petty-minded, University of Life, what do so-called experts know, you can't say/do anything these days mindset that's been bubbling away under the national psyche for decades and is now being allowed to overflow into every discourse. I'm sorry that I can't remember who said it the other day but people don't care, and when you don't care you vote Conservative.
Arrowhead, Watchman liked this
#619700
davidjay wrote:
Thu Aug 06, 2020 4:06 pm
Much as I hope crabcakes is right, the pessimist in me believes that Johnson has tapped into the xenophobic, bigoted, mean-spirited, petty-minded, University of Life, what do so-called experts know, you can't say/do anything these days mindset that's been bubbling away under the national psyche for decades and is now being allowed to overflow into every discourse. I'm sorry that I can't remember who said it the other day but people don't care, and when you don't care you vote Conservative.
I said it :)

And I think it’s true - but I also think people will soon have many, many reasons to care
By mr angry manchester
Membership Days Posts
#619704
They will, but they will probably still blame it on foreigners/single mothers/immigrants/the EU/Labour councils etc etc.

They will still wave plastic union jacks (probably made in China) and obsess about our boys and poppies and shit.
 
By Andy McDandy
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#619707
Look at Thatcher in 1983. Patriotism and a few get rich quick opportunities vs too many ideas.

Lots of people don't mind if things are shit, as long as they're a bit less shit for themselves compared to their neighbours.
By mr angry manchester
Membership Days Posts
#619710
I think the unemployment in the 80s was a bit like that of the 30s. It was confined to a few areas of the country and the same ones both times, South Wales, the North East, Yorkshire, Lancashire, parts of Scotland. The South was unaffected pretty much,which meant that it could be ignored by the unaffected parts of the country.

This covid led recession will be different, it will impact the service sector and can't be regionalised in the same way.
By mr angry manchester
Membership Days Posts
#619714
Not to anything like the same degree as the industrial areas of the North though. At that time I was working at an insurance brokers in Manchester and a lot of the commercial clients were engineering and textiles. One after the other closed down and went bust over a 12 month period and a lot of the factories near where I lived shut down.
By mr angry manchester
Membership Days Posts
#619716
Some good points in that. I'm always put in mind of Poulson and co over property development. Manchester city council appears to be little more than a front organisation for developers now, why does the city need all these fucking ugly glass boxes?
  • 1
  • 414
  • 415
  • 416
  • 417
  • 418
  • 446
The Tories, Generally

No it isn't. It's his job and duty to do those thi[…]

Meanwhile in America

Mitch McConnell will go down as one of the greates[…]

Boris Johnson

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-546[…]

Labour, Generally.

That's the busiest part of the existing networ[…]