Discussion of the UK Government
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By davidjay
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#626448
When you compare, say, the salary of an MP to an experienced barrister or accountant, a cabinet minister to a senior partner and the Prime Minister to the CEO of a multi-national, then you do understand the peanuts/monkeys adage, even allowing for generous expenses and allowances. Pay the going rate, prevent outside jobs and they aren't allowed to lobby or work directly with politicians in the future.
 
By Bones McCoy
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#626453
davidjay wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 8:31 pm
When you compare, say, the salary of an MP to an experienced barrister or accountant, a cabinet minister to a senior partner and the Prime Minister to the CEO of a multi-national, then you do understand the peanuts/monkeys adage, even allowing for generous expenses and allowances. Pay the going rate, prevent outside jobs and they aren't allowed to lobby or work directly with politicians in the future.
On the other hand, it's job that requires no qualifications or certifications, there are no mandatory duties or hours.
I know that some/many of them put in remarkably long hours.
Other's don't. And £75K plus living expenses guaranteed for 5 years is pretty good going if you manage to do the bare minimum.
 
By davidjay
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#626455
Bones McCoy wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 9:29 pm
davidjay wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 8:31 pm
When you compare, say, the salary of an MP to an experienced barrister or accountant, a cabinet minister to a senior partner and the Prime Minister to the CEO of a multi-national, then you do understand the peanuts/monkeys adage, even allowing for generous expenses and allowances. Pay the going rate, prevent outside jobs and they aren't allowed to lobby or work directly with politicians in the future.
On the other hand, it's job that requires no qualifications or certifications, there are no mandatory duties or hours.
I know that some/many of them put in remarkably long hours.
Other's don't. And £75K plus living expenses guaranteed for 5 years is pretty good going if you manage to do the bare minimum.
That's what I'm getting at. Offer better pay and you'll get better candidates.
 
By Bones McCoy
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#626469
davidjay wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 9:42 pm
Bones McCoy wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 9:29 pm
davidjay wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 8:31 pm
When you compare, say, the salary of an MP to an experienced barrister or accountant, a cabinet minister to a senior partner and the Prime Minister to the CEO of a multi-national, then you do understand the peanuts/monkeys adage, even allowing for generous expenses and allowances. Pay the going rate, prevent outside jobs and they aren't allowed to lobby or work directly with politicians in the future.
On the other hand, it's job that requires no qualifications or certifications, there are no mandatory duties or hours.
I know that some/many of them put in remarkably long hours.
Other's don't. And £75K plus living expenses guaranteed for 5 years is pretty good going if you manage to do the bare minimum.
That's what I'm getting at. Offer better pay and you'll get better candidates.
I get that bit.
I also think the "role" requires turning into more of a "job" with minimum standards of attendance (whatever that means in this virtual world), constinuency service and participation on "Her majesty's business" as opposed to "Unclre Rupert's, or Tufton Street's".

I've heard the arguments against.
They are few (That's not to say without merit) and treated like tedious revealed truth every time the question is raised.
They sound increasingly incongruous to citizens who undergo increasing surveillance at work, down to having toilet breaks timed.
They also sound like aristocratic showboating, as they come form the very body that has attacked working conditions, particularly sick pay.

Like you, I don't disagree with a pay rise.
I do think we need to attach guarantees of "supplied value" to that extra.
 
By Boiler
Posts
#626471
Considering in any other part of the workforce - especially in the public sector - pay rises always come with strings attached, why should MPs just get free money? I'd also scrap the second home allowance if an MP's constituency is within, say, 80 miles of the Commons. They can commute like everyone else.

Time to stop pretending they're speshul.
 
By davidjay
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#626478
Bones McCoy wrote:
Sun Oct 11, 2020 8:45 am
davidjay wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 9:42 pm
Bones McCoy wrote:
Sat Oct 10, 2020 9:29 pm


On the other hand, it's job that requires no qualifications or certifications, there are no mandatory duties or hours.
I know that some/many of them put in remarkably long hours.
Other's don't. And £75K plus living expenses guaranteed for 5 years is pretty good going if you manage to do the bare minimum.
That's what I'm getting at. Offer better pay and you'll get better candidates.
I get that bit.
I also think the "role" requires turning into more of a "job" with minimum standards of attendance (whatever that means in this virtual world), constinuency service and participation on "Her majesty's business" as opposed to "Unclre Rupert's, or Tufton Street's".

I've heard the arguments against.
They are few (That's not to say without merit) and treated like tedious revealed truth every time the question is raised.
They sound increasingly incongruous to citizens who undergo increasing surveillance at work, down to having toilet breaks timed.
They also sound like aristocratic showboating, as they come form the very body that has attacked working conditions, particularly sick pay.

Like you, I don't disagree with a pay rise.
I do think we need to attach guarantees of "supplied value" to that extra.
Which is why I said no second jobs. Work 9-5 rather than have all-night sittings. Have paid constituency assistants to take over surgeries. And far more stringent regulations on what they can do when they leave.
 
By Cyclist
Membership Days Posts
#626479
Boiler wrote:
Sun Oct 11, 2020 8:57 am
Considering in any other part of the workforce - especially in the public sector - pay rises always come with strings attached, why should MPs just get free money? I'd also scrap the second home allowance if an MP's constituency is within, say, 80 miles of the Commons. They can commute like everyone else.

Time to stop pretending they're speshul.
Further to the above, can we do to them what they've been doing to the civil servants for the last ten years:

Give them a much smaller than asked for rise, and make 75-100% of it "non-consolidated". ie, you get it in your pay packet but it doesn't count towards your pension*. And increase their pension contributions. And make them wait longer before they can claim their pension. And make the pension payments and lump sum smaller. Fair's fair. We're all in it together.


*My pay slips show I have a gross annual salary of £18,000. My pension statements are calculated on £16,560. That's a fucking big difference.
Boiler liked this
 
By Cyclist
Membership Days Posts
#626489
A lot of companies count irregular / unsociable hours premiums and London weighting as "add-ons", so don't count as part of basic salary for pension purposes. That's quite normal.
The civil service has been forced to accept a system where part of the basic salary doesn't count as basic salary for pension purposes. That's the difference
oboogie liked this
 
By Boiler
Posts
#626495
Cyclist wrote:
Sun Oct 11, 2020 11:13 am
The civil service has been forced to accept a system where part of the basic salary doesn't count as basic salary for pension purposes. That's the difference
That's just plain wrong. :evil:
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