Discussion of the UK Government
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By spoonman
Membership Days Posts
#582405
Abernathy wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 5:57 pm
Imperial units of measurement are quite useful for those of us who are ageing or American.
'xcept that British imperial units and American imperial units are not always the same.

I don' t doubt that it is largely a generational thing. When I'm quoting measurements to my parents for nearly anything, I have to mentally convert in my head from SI to inches or feet. On the other hand, my grandfather - whom is 88 - is perfectly happy to take SI at face value as he spent much of his life working in farming and mechanical engineering and quickly picked up millimetres and metres once they were introduced as a standard.

TBH the way units are muddled up in the UK is something of a compromise that isn't ideal. And I'm not on about certain imperial units in common use that elsewhere is still a common shorthand for a certain value largely due to tradition, like asking for a pint of beer or milk or a pound of meat - I'm more focused on the legal and formal rather than the informal. As I'm now in my late 30's I remember as a child being taught measurements in metric yet remember on car journeys seeing road signs and distances in miles/mph and couldn't comprehend them until a few years later.

AFAIK if the Canadians could do it, the Aussies could do it, the Kiwis could do it and even the Irish could do it, there is no excuse for Britain to do it other than some sort of misplaced inertia or stubbornness. It doesn't mean that you can't tell long lost relatives etc. your height in feet & inches, just that for legal record keeping purposes it'll be metres & centimetres as standard.
 
By Malcolm Armsteen
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#582409
You can have both, provided you don't try mix 'n match.
France went over to the metric system in 1795, but you can still buy beer in pintes. (yes, sorry Gammon, it's a French word). Or a demi-livre (half pound) of meat.

The point being that your demi-livre will be 450 grams in reality, and your pinte will be 900ml.

Just like here, though I think a quarter pound now comes out at 250g.

When chatting approximately you can use inches (pouces) as in 'Vraiment, Sylvie, c'est dix puces'.

But don't try doing space engineering with it.
 
By Biggus Robbus
#582412
US fluid ounce differs from Imperial fluid ounce.

US pint is 16 US floz while UK pint is 20 Imperial floz.

Electronics uses imperial a lot because integrated circuits were developed in the US.

0.1" is 2.54mm.

If Jacob Rees Mogg asked me to calculate magnetics in Oersteds rather than Ampere/Metres the cunt is getting a wedgie.
Last edited by Biggus Robbus on Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
By spoonman
Membership Days Posts
#582435
Off hand, I can usually convert the following without too much trouble normally. All conversions are approximates, but accurate enough for day to day use...

* 1 litre = 1.76 pints. When I was young I used to remember the lemonade & orangeade bottles often labelled as containing "2 litres/3.52 pints", and the pint value is very close to a common fraction.

* Conversely, 1 pint = 567ml. I remember this because RTÉ Radio 1, when it was on medium wave radio, was transmitted on 567kHz. Plus having three consecutive numbers help.

* 1kg = 2.2lb. Again, a fairly simple conversion to remember. And on the flip side...

* 1lb = 454g. Burned into memory because everything that used to be packaged by the pound simply shows 454g now. With 1/2lb being 227g.

* 1 mile = 1.6km. In bigger multiples, 5 miles work out to 8 kilometres, so using multiples of five and eight can help quickly convert one to another. Years ago from having pen pals in my teenage years in mainland Europe, a mile was one of the few Non-SI units they were familiar with, being rounded to 1600 metres - forget about yards! I had to check what 1km was in miles, as I rarely have to use such a scale, using the 5 & 8 method above - as it is, its 0.62 miles to the nearest two decimal points.

* Celsius or Centigrade to Fahrenheit - the old formula of multiply by nine, divide by five and add 32, with Fahrenheit to Celsius/Centigrade being in reverse. However I simply take an increase of 1C degree to be 1.8F degrees, using common bases of 0C = 32F, 10C = 50F, 20C = 68F and 30C = 86F and work from there, e.g. -5C = 32-(5x1.8) = 32-(9) = 23F. For more exotic temperatures, I just use the first mentioned formula. Most weather reports I seen up until the late 90's or early 00's used to quote both figures, but other than a few notable outlets it's just Celsius these days.
 
By Boiler
Posts
#582437
Same here, with the same units (plus feet and metres). My knowledge of miles/km came from looking at the speedometers in my godfather's new cars: my father's cars were still MPH only until he bought his Cortina in 1988.

I also remember the rounding for Fahrenheit conversion and for some reason I can still do LSD to decimal.
 
By spoonman
Membership Days Posts
#582439
Boiler wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 10:26 pm
Same here, with the same units (plus feet and metres). My knowledge of miles/km came from looking at the speedometers in my godfather's new cars: my father's cars were still MPH only until he bought his Cortina in 1988.

I also remember the rounding for Fahrenheit conversion and for some reason I can still do LSD to decimal.
Whoops! Forgot those!

* 1 inch = 2.54cm or 25.4mm
* 1 foot = 30.5cm or 305mm

So for example, 6 feet = 1.83m or 183cm. Worked from (6 x 30) + (6 x 0.5) = (180) + (3).
 
By Bones McCoy
Membership Days Posts
#582476
Malcolm Armsteen wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:11 pm
You can have both, provided you don't try mix 'n match.
France went over to the metric system in 1795, but you can still buy beer in pintes. (yes, sorry Gammon, it's a French word). Or a demi-livre (half pound) of meat.

The point being that your demi-livre will be 450 grams in reality, and your pinte will be 900ml.

Just like here, though I think a quarter pound now comes out at 250g.

When chatting approximately you can use inches (pouces) as in 'Vraiment, Sylvie, c'est dix puces'.

But don't try doing space engineering with it.
Over in the low countries you could buy goods in pund (500g) not far off a pound and onz (100g) nowhere near an imperial ounce.

Back when each country had its own measurements, there was a massive shock when attempting to put
captured artillery pieces into action (That Napoleon bloke took about 800 off the Prussians in a month).
The French (Paris) pound was about 10% heavier than a british pound - very close to half a kilogramme.
 
By Boiler
Posts
#582478
Malcolm Armsteen wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:11 pm
You can have both, provided you don't try mix 'n match.
France went over to the metric system in 1795, but you can still buy beer in pintes. (yes, sorry Gammon, it's a French word). Or a demi-livre (half pound) of meat.

The point being that your demi-livre will be 450 grams in reality, and your pinte will be 900ml.

Just like here, though I think a quarter pound now comes out at 250g.

When chatting approximately you can use inches (pouces) as in 'Vraiment, Sylvie, c'est dix puces'.

But don't try doing space engineering with it.
You mean to say those Parisian bastards have been short-changing me of 400mL of beer when they offer a pinte? Swines!
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