Topics about the Labour Party
:sunglasses: 56.3 % ❤ 1.1 % :thumbsup: 11.8 % 😯 2.6 % :grinning: 20.2 % 🧥 0.4 % 🙏 1.1 % 😟 2.6 % :cry: 3.3 % :shit: 0.7 %
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By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#308781
Kreuzberger wrote:
youngian wrote: Not sure how Britain on its own is going to tackle international corporate tax abuse either.
Corporation tax regulations need to harmonised but that has nowt to do with the need for individuals being required to register with Vieux Gillaume in Belgium or with his counterparts in most other European states.
Don't think Mann was trying to link them but just getting a few disparate EU gripes off his chest.

I would have thought EU tax harminisation is a more a practical way forward. Is Mann proposing an army of custom officers on the Irish border searching for Amazon online ordered books?
 
By Kreuzberger
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#308790
youngian wrote:
Kreuzberger wrote:
youngian wrote: Not sure how Britain on its own is going to tackle international corporate tax abuse either.
Corporation tax regulations need to harmonised but that has nowt to do with the need for individuals being required to register with Vieux Gillaume in Belgium or with his counterparts in most other European states.
Don't think Mann was trying to link them but just getting a few disparate EU gripes off his chest.

I would have thought EU tax harminisation is a more a practical way forward. Is Mann proposing an army of custom officers on the Irish border searching for Amazon online ordered books?
Which takes us off on a slightly different tangent. Only a agreed minimum rate of corporation tax can solve the issue of states like Ireland and Bulgaria off-whoring to companies from other EU countries with higher CT rates. The same would go for VAT and its equivalents.
By new puritan
Membership Days Posts
#309300
Interesting piece from LabourList on the atrophied state of South Shields CLP.
In a by-election, organisation and data are everything. And whilst by election day there was a decent Labour Party campaign on the ground in the constituency, it appears there was little in the way of campaigning taking place in the seat prior to the by-election. Several very reliable sources have told me that the voter contact rate (the percentage of people in the constituency for whom the party has a record of voting preference) in the constituency was as low as 0.2% – or roughly 100 people. That’s effectively zero, and enough to suggest that little or no canvassing had ever been done in the seat. One volunteer who campaigned in South Shields, but who wants to remain anonymous, told me:

“As I knocked on doors, it was depressing to hear former Labour voters saying they’d stay at home or vote for a protest party because David “did nothing for South Shields, I never saw him”. We were told that the voter contact rate had been just 0.2% before the by-election – and the 100 people this equates to had been transferred into the constituency following boundary changes.”

By election day – thanks to work on the ground by new MP Emma Lewell-Buck, party staff, local activists and the central phone bank – the contact rate in the constituency was up to a more respectable (but still quite low) 20%.

So the question must be asked – what on earth was David Miliband doing in this seat over the previous 12 years? How many doors did he knock on and how many constituents did he speak to? Which local campaigns were run and what data was collected? And this isn’t just about David Miliband – although after all of his talk of re-engaging the party, he could at least have started in his own constituency. Where was the canvassing from the local councillors in this Labour heartland? Or is there an expectation that the voters will just turn up and vote Labour without any contact from the party or their local representatives?
http://labourlist.org/2013/05/we-need-t ... h-shields/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Seeing as Miliband major made such a big song and dance about Movement for Change, it's a bit alarming that his own CLP should be in such a mess. That's what happens, though, when you prioritise swing voters over everyone else - time-served Labour voters in far too many safe seats are just expected to do their duty by voting Labour every few years, then pipe down for the rest of the time. This kind of complacency really does piss me off and South Shields isn't the only CLP to be guilty of it.
By Dacre Bleugh
Membership Days Membership Days
#309640
UKIP's share of the vote in areas like South Shields is worrying, especially when it should be easy pickings for Labour:
The last shipbuilder, John Readhead & Sons, closed in 1984 and the last pit, Westoe Colliery, in 1993. Today, the town relies largely on service industries, whilst many residents commute to work in nearby Newcastle, Gateshead, North Tyneside and Sunderland.

Despite a skilled local workforce, for many years South Tyneside had the highest unemployment rate in mainland Britain, although between December 2002 and December 2008 unemployment in South Shields fell by 17.8%, and that of South Tyneside by 17.7%,[10] the best performance in the North East region over that time period.
By new puritan
Membership Days Posts
#309662
Dacre Bleugh wrote:UKIP's share of the vote in areas like South Shields is worrying, especially when it should be easy pickings for Labour:
The last shipbuilder, John Readhead & Sons, closed in 1984 and the last pit, Westoe Colliery, in 1993. Today, the town relies largely on service industries, whilst many residents commute to work in nearby Newcastle, Gateshead, North Tyneside and Sunderland.

Despite a skilled local workforce, for many years South Tyneside had the highest unemployment rate in mainland Britain, although between December 2002 and December 2008 unemployment in South Shields fell by 17.8%, and that of South Tyneside by 17.7%,[10] the best performance in the North East region over that time period.
I'm not that concerned about it, to be honest. It isn't that surprising that UKIP are racking up second places in northern by-elections - the Tories are busily retoxifying themselves (and it wasn't as if they were popular here to begin with), and what's more they're taking the Lib Dems with them. I mean I'd obviously prefer to see the Greens or another left party competing with Labour rather than UKIP, but I'm not convinced it's really that big a deal.
By Dacre Bleugh
Membership Days Membership Days
#309814
new puritan wrote:
Dacre Bleugh wrote: I'm not that concerned about it, to be honest. It isn't that surprising that UKIP are racking up second places in northern by-elections - the Tories are busily retoxifying themselves (and it wasn't as if they were popular here to begin with), and what's more they're taking the Lib Dems with them. I mean I'd obviously prefer to see the Greens or another left party competing with Labour rather than UKIP, but I'm not convinced it's really that big a deal.
That's just the problem. I think they have - in the form of UKIP. Plus, UKIP seem much more adept at attracting working-class support without the Thatcherite baggage - despite having Thatcherism-on-acid economic policies;
http://www.academia.edu/245067/Strategi ... _Elections" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Think there's a worry with younger males too - be they apolitical, apathetic, small c conservatives or EDL knuckle-dragger types. They didn't experience Thatcherism first hand and consequential economic decline in some areas. Thus, they're more prone to hold greater resentment towards Blair and Brown for cultural reasons (read: "immigrants are making this town shit"), rather than consider material and social deprivation resulting from economic policy and cuts. It's like how the debate has been framed in Boston - i.e. "immigrants putting a strain on services" rather than considering these services may actually be underfunded in the first place.

Realistically, UKIP are probably not going to pick up many - if any - seats in 2015. At worst, they may end up as part of a Tory/UKIP coalition, which would be pretty scary!

I do think Labour need to up their game regarding framing debates about Europe and immigration rather than shadow the right. Hollande tried this and it only boosted Le-Pen. e.g. focus on introducing legislation regarding exploitative "foreign" agencies rather than foreign workers themselves. Actually call out the gutter press for their scaremongering - being seen standing up to the "establishment" media will surely win a few hearts and minds. It may seem paradoxical, but attacking the populist media could in itself be quite a populist move.

If Ed really wants to show a vision for "one nation", a good place to start would be going in studs-first on those who are dividing it.
 
By The Weeping Angel
Membership Days Posts
#309852
For me Labour are trying to play both left and right on immigration. On the one hand admitting they got it wrong and trying to sound tough, on the other hand saying we'll enforce the minimum wage, stopping the exploitation of migrant workers strenghten the Gangmasters Licencing Authority et cetera.

Although both Milliband and Michael Dugher have said you can't out Farage Farage.
Last edited by The Weeping Angel on Sun May 12, 2013 4:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
By mattomac
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#310003
The problem for UKIP is they aren't taking enough votes in areas were they need to, you look at the areas Labour have won in and they were winning again, UKIP were taking Councillors mostly from the Tories and of course that meant Labour were slightly down on the 300 predicted by independent sources it meant they weren't far off.

It is reminding me a lot of the American elections.
By Dacre Bleugh
Membership Days Membership Days
#310101
mattomac wrote: It is reminding me a lot of the American elections.
Me too. I'm wondering if the same "Tea Party effect" might happen here. i.e. After the initial buzz and momentum, "average" voters started to see sections of the GOP as the nutters they are, which turned people off by association. Plus, in 2008 the whole vibe of Obama's "hope" campaign shone through against McCain & Palin's negative campaigning.

Think Labour could really rinse the GB Olympics nostalgia for all its "one nation" worth (in a non-Riefenstahl sense of course). It could be used to demonstrate "multiculturalism" in a patriotic, yet positive light. Yet simultaneously, it sidelines and marginalises the likes of UKIP and Tories such as Aidan "leftie multicultural crap" Burley. It would be beneficial to tie a campaign to one of the few events between 2010-15 which can (or will) be associated with a "feel-good" factor.
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