Topics about the Labour Party
:sunglasses: 58.3 % ❤ 2.9 % :thumbsup: 15.7 % 😯 1.5 % :grinning: 18.1 % 🧥 1 % 🙏 0.5 % 😟 1 % :cry: 1 %
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By Malcolm Armsteen
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#631095
New Statesman view:
How will Labour vote on a possible Brexit deal? The issue that has dogged the party since the referendum result in 2016 rears its head yet again, as discussions begin within Labour about how it should vote on any deal negotiated between the UK and EU ahead of the end of the transition period. There's no deal to vote on as of yet, and there may not be one, but the conversation began in earnest at a meeting of the parliamentary Labour party (PLP) last night.

Given the size of the Conservative majority, and the manifesto commitment that those Conservative MPs made to vote for a Brexit deal, any decision that Labour takes on the issue is, in many ways, academic. If it gets to the point where the government brings back a Brexit deal to the House of Commons, it is guaranteed to pass with Conservative votes, barring a truly extraordinary chain of events. That means no deal will be effectively off the table and the deal will pass, regardless of whether Labour votes against, in favour, or abstains.

But, as Labour has demonstrated with difficult and at times controversial decisions over voting on issues of national security, the way the party votes does matter a great deal in terms of the message it sends to the country as to its position on the issue in question. It has to vote as though its votes matter, in other words.

With that in mind, Rachel Reeves (who, as Michael Gove's opposite number as shadow Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, takes responsibility for the Brexit and outsourcing briefs) led a discussion about all three options at last night's PLP. She emphasised that she and the Labour leader intend to look at any deal in detail before reaching a conclusion, and sources emphasise that a decision hasn't been made, but the bottom line of the discussion is that "at the moment, the inclination across the board, led by Keir, is leaning towards voting for a deal, rather than abstaining", per a Labour source.

Even Labour MPs who voted against triggering Article 50, and who have grave concerns about the likely content of a hard Brexit deal and its impact on Northern Ireland in particular, appreciate the strategic case for the Labour leadership acting like a government in waiting on this issue, as with all issues that come before the Commons. One MP who has "been fighting tooth and nail against this bad deal", who hasn't ruled out abstaining, notes that there is a "strong view to unite behind decisive leadership". That would mean a firm decision on the deal, voting either for or against, rather than abstaining, with MPs rowing in behind the leadership's decision with minimal rebellion.

The case, as it was made last night, is that abstaining on a deal could look like a vote in favour of no deal, while a vote to support the deal indicates that Labour is listening to voters and wants to draw a line under the Brexit issue. Sarah Owen, Margaret Beckett and Liam Byrne are all understood to have spoken in favour of this approach, expressing concerns about the impact that no deal could have on manufacturing in their constituencies. The deal should also, Reeves argued, be viewed as a base from which things could be improved, rather than a final settlement.

But it will still be a bitter pill to swallow for Labour MPs in strongly pro-Remain constituencies with serious concerns about Brexit full stop. Recent polling indicates that voters in pro-Remain London constituencies would understand if their MPs voted in favour of a deal, and the Labour leadership clearly hopes that this, and the strategic case to draw a line under Brexit as a united party, will be enough to convince them. But these MPs say privately that the only thing that will make up their minds will be speaking to their own constituents and seeing the detail of the deal. A Labour split on the issue is still a possibility.
 
By Tubby Isaacs
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#631098
The deal should also, Reeves argued, be viewed as a base from which things could be improved, rather than a final settlement.
I think that's nonsense, I'm afraid.

How much time has the EU had to waste on Brexit? Why should they want to sit down and do more negotiations after agreeing this deal? Labour can regard the deal as anything it likes but the the EU can't be made to regard it like that.

And if they want to reassure the "Red Wall" that they aren't trying to get out of the referendum/2019 election, then I think it's going to be pretty bad if Labour's arguing for a new EU deal after one's already been done. Johnson will say "there they go again!".

Hard to see that the deal will not be bad, in a slow burning kind of way. Make that point. Be clear you're not saying collapse next week, but ask people in 2024 if Tory Brexit made them better off.
Timbo liked this
 
By Tubby Isaacs
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#631651
Starmer says Labour will abstain on the new Covid regulations in England.

Not sure about this. Abstain on this and a Brexit deal very close together and you'll get a reputation. Brexit is the more one where it's harder to vote against, because you might find a load of Tory-Kippers follow you in the lobby and you're staring at No Deal.
 
By Boiler
Posts
#631652
There's a difference between "making the Tories own their shit" and "taking a stand", but is abstention always the best way? Sooner or later it establishes a narrative of being indecisive.
Tubby Isaacs, Abernathy liked this
 
By Malcolm Armsteen
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#631672
Of course he is...

He's aiming for the Mantle of Magic Grandpa. Whatever the leadership wants, vote against it and then claim you are on the right side of history. Requires no thought, analysis or strategic understanding.

I wonder if he will blame 'Zionists' this time?
Arrowhead liked this
 
By Arrowhead
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#631675
Malcolm Armsteen wrote:
Tue Dec 01, 2020 11:39 am
Of course he is...

He's aiming for the Mantle of Magic Grandpa. Whatever the leadership wants, vote against it and then claim you are on the right side of history. Requires no thought, analysis or strategic understanding.

I wonder if he will blame 'Zionists' this time?
The likes of Burgon and Lavery clearly fancy themselves as the main standard-bearers of the New Left, or whatever they are calling themselves this week. They're probably just biding their time until Len finally launches his pro-Brexit Workers Party (Jewish folk need not apply).

Sir Keir can sleep easy.
 
By Malcolm Armsteen
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#631682
Other left-wing organisations are available:

Respect (now disRespect)
Socialist Workers Party
Socialist Resistance
Trade Union and Socialist Coalition
Left Unity
Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist)
Communist Party of Britain (splitters)(also Marxist-Leninist)
Communist League
Alliance for Green Socialism
Socialist Equality Party
Socialist Labour Party
Socialist Party of Great Britain
Workers' Revolutionary Party
Anarchist Federation
Communist Workers' Organisation
International Socialist League
Independent Working Class Association
Revolutionary Communist Group
Revolutionary Communist Party of Britain (Marxist–Leninist)
Solidarity Federation
Spartacist League
Workers' Fight
Lewisham People Before Profit
Old Swan Against the Cuts
West Dunbartonshire Community Party
Birkenhead Social Justice Party


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