Discussion of other UK political parties
:sunglasses: 49.1 % ❤ 3.5 % :thumbsup: 7 % :grinning: 29.8 % 🧥 5.3 % 🙏 1.8 % 😟 1.8 % :shit: 1.8 %
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By Andy McDandy
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#568694
Which is indeed a good thing. I'm just curious that whenever this is mooted, the main response is that it's a great opportunity for other people's kids. But not our little darlings. Or in a blunter form, "a chance to hoover up the chavs".
 
By Malcolm Armsteen
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#568699
https://www.lesechos.fr/politique-socie ... 172980.php

http://www.madmoizelle.com/service-nati ... ron-878793
A bit nationalistic (this is France, after all)
The program for these adolescents continues to take shape following the communique of the ministerial cabinet of National Education and Youth.

In particular, we learn that young people will have to get up at dawn to greet the flag and sing the national anthem, dressed in a uniform.
Educators and soldiers will be responsible for teaching young people first aid, as well as how to react in the event of a terrorist attack.

Courses on Republican values and environmental protection will also be provided.

The government hopes to train "citizen-actors" during this course, with practical lessons such as role-play, forest walks or orienteering races.

Finally, French language assessments and a health check will be required.
The universal national service is becoming a reality little by little.

After conducting a survey of young people about their opinion and expectations about the SNU, Gabriel Attal, the government member in charge of the case granted an interview to the Parisian.

Remember, the UNS should take the form of a mandatory month, consisting of two weeks in boarding, and the possibility of a continuation of this SNU later for those who wish.

According to Gabriel Attal, the consultation revealed that a quarter of young people say that they do not want to do this.

In terms of content, it seems that the most popular learning aspect concerns reactions in the event of a terrorist attack or natural disaster, but also an environmental awareness.
To be honest, it doesn't look that bad. One month, of which two weeks residential, and some citizenship stuff.
 
By Tubby Isaacs
Membership Days Posts
#568700
Malcolm Armsteen wrote:
Sun Mar 10, 2019 11:49 am
For the purpose of increased social cohesion by bringing together kids of different backgrounds who would otherwise never meet.

Why is that a bad thing?
It's OK as long as people don't overdo the claims for that. The sort of budget it'll get it'll be kids of different backgrounds going on a camp for a few weeks and doing some National Trust working holiday type stuff. Politicians oversell this stuff.
 
By Bones McCoy
Membership Days Posts
#568737
Tubby Isaacs wrote:
Sun Mar 10, 2019 3:18 pm
Malcolm Armsteen wrote:
Sun Mar 10, 2019 11:49 am
For the purpose of increased social cohesion by bringing together kids of different backgrounds who would otherwise never meet.

Why is that a bad thing?
It's OK as long as people don't overdo the claims for that. The sort of budget it'll get it'll be kids of different backgrounds going on a camp for a few weeks and doing some National Trust working holiday type stuff. Politicians oversell this stuff.
It's worth asking whether Rupert and Jocasta will miss the Argentine polo season to attend National Service camp.
Or will Britain descend into an epidemic of heel-spurs.
Timbo liked this
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#568765
Umunna isn't referring to compulsory military service but what he is proposing is an embryo for a public sector led national apprenticeship service that is comprehensive. Better to frame the idea in those terms instead of evoking two years of potato peeling in a barracks with William Hartnell.*

* Starred in popular 1950s national service sit-com The Army Game. A cultural reference so old kids that Littlejohn hasn't even quoted it.
By Dan
Membership Days Membership Days
#569336
I hope these goons have not done too much damage to the campaign for a People's Vote. They were told that now was not the time for it but evidently, a dig at Corbyn was more important than getting this vital chance of stop Brexit right.

Eviscerate Corbyn and his performance (which they have the right to do and many will agree with) when all is said and done. Not now. They've fallen into the exact same trap they've accused him of.

Self-serving cretins.
Arrowhead liked this
 
By The Weeping Angel
Membership Days Posts
#569345
Dan wrote:
Sat Mar 16, 2019 5:18 pm
I hope these goons have not done too much damage to the campaign for a People's Vote. They were told that now was not the time for it but evidently, a dig at Corbyn was more important than getting this vital chance of stop Brexit right.

Eviscerate Corbyn and his performance (which they have the right to do and many will agree with) when all is said and done. Not now. They've fallen into the exact same trap they've accused him of.

Self-serving cretins.
So when is the right time?
 
By Abernathy
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#569359
Dan wrote:
Sat Mar 16, 2019 5:18 pm
I hope these goons have not done too much damage to the campaign for a People's Vote. They were told that now was not the time for it but evidently, a dig at Corbyn was more important than getting this vital chance of stop Brexit right.

Eviscerate Corbyn and his performance (which they have the right to do and many will agree with) when all is said and done. Not now. They've fallen into the exact same trap they've accused him of.

Self-serving cretins.
Well, to be fair, one of the prime reasons the ex-Labour Tiggers left was Corbyn's endless prevarication on backing a final say referendum while spuriously claiming to just be following party policy. Once free of the party, they were quite entitled to try to engineer one themselves.

I don't think they will have done any damage to the Peoples' Vote Campaign. The best hope remains the Kyle-Wilson amendment, which Labour is hopefully backing (and I say hopefully because with Magic Grandpa you never bloody know).
 
By Biggus Robbus
#569427
Even if you don't agree with the politics of TIG as long you can accept their existence is necessary for pluralistic politics then everything is cool.

Before Iraq, Blair won two landslide elections and, contrary to the lies told about him, he maintained a political pluralism in the UK. He did represent a large proportion of the electorate and improved the lives of many people who had been unfairly shut out of the system.

Britain performs better when it is centrist it seems. It can react to problems without the dogma that plagues the right and left.

It is just the sensible option. I am rather glad that the positive side of Tony Blair's government is now being remembered.

Iraq was a debacle because of Donald Rumsfeld and Dubya not firing Donald Rumsfeld. If Gates and Petraeus were in charge from the beginning Iraq may have turned out very differently.
 
By Winegums
Membership Days Posts
#569435
Do you really think the centre isn't driven by ideology? Because lol.
 
By Winegums
Membership Days Posts
#569443
That's just nonsense. "What will work best?" Is totally ideology driven. If removing tuition fees costs £1bn per year but improves working class representation at university by 45%, whether or not it's a good idea isn't just a straightforward sum. It's always going to come down to ideology (do you cut another service? Raise taxes? Which ones?). Centrists have tried to square the circle by half arsing it with means testing and tax credits, but we've reached a point where that's not enough for the powerful or those left behind by neoliberalism. You can kick the ideology can down the road but it always come back to whether your care about parks more than fracking, or landlords more than tennants.
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