Political talk from outside of the UK
:sunglasses: 50 % :cry: 50 %
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By spoonman
Membership Days Posts
#392014
The problem with that article is that it looks at the protests from a narrow view of the political spectrum - the protests have been a fairly broad church, indeed a number of these protests have attempted to be hijacked by Freeman Of The Land loons, the same ones who effectively killed a similar Occupy Dublin movement stone dead because hardly anyone wanted to be associated with them. Think of Occupy London and the resultant pieces some "Freemen" were given as a platform on CiF.

Also, it's the case that the state's water & sewage network, although extensive, doesn't reach all of the population in the Republic. The dispersed nature of the population in the country means a lot of people are dependent on wells & septic tanks, and some others who are on locally run community water schemes who have been metered for years without any rebate in taxes because the state declined to supply them. From listening to some people in this category, they aren't terribly sympathetic to these protests, seeing the establishment of Irish Water as an "equaliser" of sorts. The lack of domestic rates in the Republic of Ireland also doesn't help in terms of transparency here either.

It's also only a matter of time that similar charges are brought in north of the border to domestic properties for NI Water - they've been delayed now for a number of years and the network needs to be upgraded in a lot of areas.
By new puritan
Membership Days Posts
#392145
spoonman wrote:The problem with that article is that it looks at the protests from a narrow view of the political spectrum - the protests have been a fairly broad church, indeed a number of these protests have attempted to be hijacked by Freeman Of The Land loons, the same ones who effectively killed a similar Occupy Dublin movement stone dead because hardly anyone wanted to be associated with them. Think of Occupy London and the resultant pieces some "Freemen" were given as a platform on CiF.

Also, it's the case that the state's water & sewage network, although extensive, doesn't reach all of the population in the Republic. The dispersed nature of the population in the country means a lot of people are dependent on wells & septic tanks, and some others who are on locally run community water schemes who have been metered for years without any rebate in taxes because the state declined to supply them. From listening to some people in this category, they aren't terribly sympathetic to these protests, seeing the establishment of Irish Water as an "equaliser" of sorts. The lack of domestic rates in the Republic of Ireland also doesn't help in terms of transparency here either.

It's also only a matter of time that similar charges are brought in north of the border to domestic properties for NI Water - they've been delayed now for a number of years and the network needs to be upgraded in a lot of areas.
Interesting, cheers. This campaign certainly seems to have got the media foaming at the mouth though, judging by this piece.

http://criticalmediareview.wordpress.co ... er-fringe/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
By new puritan
Membership Days Posts
#393007
Really liked this.
Once you've held the line that there is a whole class of people who are entitled to everything to which those beneath them are not entitled - things like truckloads of money, and more truckloads of money on top of that - you are bound to feel strong in your faith, perhaps invincible.

So when something like Irish Water arrives, with all that lovely public money about to start flowing through the pipes, you hardly even have to think about filling up the old truck and sending it out there again with its massive load. You just do it, and you work out the reasons for it later.

Indeed, it has all become so unthinking, it seems to have gone too far. It has triggered a reaction that seems to have been brewing for a long time, as Paddy finally declares that he doesn't believe all that stuff any more - in fact, he probably never believed it, he was just a bit dazed from the incessant reminders of the duty of care that we owe to the over-privileged.

And so various ministers try to present a new vision of Irish Water that they think will be better received, not realising that this is not about water any more, it's about every damn thing.
http://www.independent.ie/opinion/colum ... 29178.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
 
By spoonman
Membership Days Posts
#393295
new puritan wrote:Really liked this.
Once you've held the line that there is a whole class of people who are entitled to everything to which those beneath them are not entitled - things like truckloads of money, and more truckloads of money on top of that - you are bound to feel strong in your faith, perhaps invincible.

So when something like Irish Water arrives, with all that lovely public money about to start flowing through the pipes, you hardly even have to think about filling up the old truck and sending it out there again with its massive load. You just do it, and you work out the reasons for it later.

Indeed, it has all become so unthinking, it seems to have gone too far. It has triggered a reaction that seems to have been brewing for a long time, as Paddy finally declares that he doesn't believe all that stuff any more - in fact, he probably never believed it, he was just a bit dazed from the incessant reminders of the duty of care that we owe to the over-privileged.

And so various ministers try to present a new vision of Irish Water that they think will be better received, not realising that this is not about water any more, it's about every damn thing.
http://www.independent.ie/opinion/colum ... 29178.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Not a bad article. The principle behind the setting up Irish Water - in that even in a country where you see precipitation the majority of the days of the year and it's lack of for more than 7-10 days is considered "decent weather" that there is rarely a "lack of primary resource" - whereby it needs to acknowledge that the water needs to be collected, treated, distributed along with its sewage disposal, and by appropriately charged for is a sound enough one (allowing for public health & realising that water can't simply be treated on its own as just another commodity). However it is in the eyes of many people there a straw that is breaking the camel's back of many working & middle class people with the additional charges (Universal Service Charge, VAT increase to 23% etc.) that have built up over the last few years. Then when you also have the likes of the Anglo Irish Bank, a political class trying to run the line of both courting the public for cheap votes while maintaining lifestyles to distance themselves from it which sees a lot of back scratching involved, then it only seems like it'll be a matter of time before things start to boil over. The thing is that in some ways like the English, there is no real history of internalised revolution of the masses in Ireland against the establishment - while others among the PIIGS saw its fair amount of unrest, Greece in particular, the Republic of Ireland has been very quiet & tame in comparison.

Personally, my reading of historic events makes me feel that revolutions tend of occur and succeed when the middle classes of a populace, alongside lower classes, feel that they have nothing left to lose in doing so. It's something I reckon the Tories know very well, hence buttering up many people, who if not in it by reality that they feel, that are middle class by keeping them sweet and pouring on the burdens of austerity elsewhere (normally those in the C2DE zone). A nice divide & conquer strategy.

I can't speak for the tax intake structure of many other countries, but the difference between that of the UK and the Republic of Ireland means that simply looking at it from British eyes only tells part of the story. One example is that the income tax band doesn't come into play in the RoI at a higher level compared to the UK, but also that the top band rate is lower there than the 40% rate does in the UK - the lack of domestic rates is another. The housing bubble is still being felt by people who bought during the construction boom, not helped by rents at the time also being rather high meaning that it made more sense to get mortgages even at inflated prices. Plenty of people - honest people - are in negative equity, and I can't say I envy them. Then again, the make up of Dáil Éireann with STV used in elections means that the TDs there make up a much more accurate reflection of votes than the House of Commons does - a kind of self fulfilling prophecy.
 
By spoonman
Membership Days Posts
#393296
Fine Gael/Labour Government agrees to cap water charges.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-30118126" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
The Irish government has revised its plans for the introduction of domestic water charges, a key austerity measure.

The Fine Gael-Labour coalition has faced major protests over the issue.

Environment Minister Alan Kelly said charges would be capped at 160 euros (£128) for single adult households and 260 euros (£208) for others.

Announcing the revised measures, he told parliament: "We now have a choice of short-term emotion and anger or long-term prudence and common sense."

'Critical choice'

Water conservation grants of 100 euros a year (£80) mean the effective costs will be 60 euros (£48) and 160 euros (£128) respectively.

The starting date is 1 January, with the first bills to be issued in April.

Mr Kelly said: "We, as a government, have made mistakes but now we face a critical choice."

He added: "Anger is never a good starting point for a key decision."
A partial victory for those opposed to the water charges at least in the short term - but I would expect in the long term that caps will be raised to levels above inflation or even scrapped.
By new puritan
Membership Days Posts
#393725
Speaking of swivel-eyed loons, here's Ireland's Louise Mensch.
Social media has been widely adopted because of the obvious benefits: they are huge. Our interactions with fellow human beings are enhanced, we get more information more quickly and cheaply than before. Like tobacco, social media will one day have to be regulated because of the harm that it does.
It is clear that the various platforms are causing harm to children and provide practical assistance to terrorists abroad and ex-terrorists at home. Social media has brought more illness to Ireland than Ebola has. Anarchists, extremists and all-round loonies can find a voice and organisational structure – if only for a decent riot – amidst a political fragmentation that rewards those who shout the loudest.
http://www.irishtimes.com/business/sect ... -1.2012084" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Note the total panic when the working class starts to pose any sort of threat - all the state's attack dogs in the media start shrieking and clutching their pearls.
By new puritan
Membership Days Posts
#394739
When people were asked who they would vote for if an election were held tomorrow, party support – when undecideds are excluded – compared with the last Irish Times poll in October was: Fine Gael, 19 per cent (down five points); Labour, 6 per cent (down three points); Fianna Fáil, 21 per cent (up one point); Sinn Féin, 22 per cent (down two points); and Independents/Others, 32 per cent (up nine points).
http://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics ... -1.2024942" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

FF-FG-Lab grand coalition on the cards?
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#397441
http://rt.com/news/218747-hitler-henchman-irish-farmer" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

To be fair Haughey wasn't noted for his wise choice of company.
Hitler’s most prized Nazi soldier, who famously rescued Italian dictator Benito Mussolini from an allied fortress, made the unlikely transition from Europe’s most feared man to rural Irish farmer.

Otto Skorzeny, an Austrian colonel in the notorious Waffen-SS who led various Nazi guerilla and spy networks during the war and afterward, escaped from an Allied holding prison in the wake of World War II, and travelled to Argentina where he worked as a bodyguard. About a decade later, he made his way to Ireland’s County Kildare following his decision to buy a country farmhouse in the region.

He had been extended an invitation to attend an event held in his honor at a North Dublin country club hotel. Upon his arrival at the hotel reception, Skorzeny was greeted by up-and-coming Dublin socialites, including a young Charles Haughey, who later became one of Ireland’s most contentious prime ministers.
 
By Tubby Isaacs
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#397607
Just heard about this bloke. Previous hits include predicting rampant inflation post 2009.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddie_Hobbs" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

He's branched out from finance to oil, and has launched something called Our Own Oil. Can't understand why Ireland's oil licences are generous compared with Norway's.

The fact there's tons and tons of oil in Norway and they've been extracting it for ages might have something to do with it.
 
By spoonman
Membership Days Posts
#405622
If you've nothing to do for the next 24 hours or so and want to party until you wreck your freaking head, get a quick plane ticket to Dublin!

Loophole means ecstasy and loads of other
drugs are now legal (but only until Thursday)


http://www.thejournal.ie/tds-emergency- ... 9-Mar2015/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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