Area for all other political discussion
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#515527
Oh great

http://mashable.com/2017/08/06/silicon- ... KwgHJg7sq1" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
"I’ve seen what’s coming," he told me when I visited him recently for BBC Two’s Secrets of Silicon Valley. "And it’s a big self-driving truck that’s about to run over this economy."

Antonio is worried about where modern technology – especially the twin forces of automation and artificial intelligence – is taking us. He thinks it’s developing much faster than people outside Silicon Valley realize, and we’re on the cusp of another industrial revolution that will rip through the economy and destroy millions of jobs.

"Every time I meet someone from outside Silicon Valley – a normy – I can think of 10 companies that are working madly to put that person out of a job."

Antonio estimates that within 30 years, half of us will be jobless. "Things could get ugly," he told me. “It’s very scary, I think we could have some very dark days ahead of us."

Think of the miners’ strike, but in every industry. People could be be driven to the streets, he fears, and in America at least, those people have guns. Law and order could break down, he says, maybe there will be some kind of violent revolution.
Some days I wonder if it's worth getting out of bed.
 
By Boiler
Posts
#515562
@LJB: ever watched The Changes?

The thing is - whilst we're very fond of painting a dystopian future that owes more to Blade Runner than Star Trek, or Futurama with its suicide booths, it is worth remembering that for the machines to appear, someone has to build them first. And if no-one wants them, they will not get built.

Put it this way: I've been involved with technology of one sort or another for forty-plus years, and I'm not the slightest bit concerned.

The Forbin Project is not even on the horizon.

(apols for a post filled with cultural references)
#515565
Thing is - I didn't remember that film, so I looked it up. Not by trying to find it in a book, or by going to the library, but by using Google. How many times a day do I do that? How good is it that I, and every person with a smartphone or laptop can do the same? How much has that access to information already changed the world?
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#515574
Boiler wrote:@LJB: ever watched The Changes?

The thing is - whilst we're very fond of painting a dystopian future that owes more to Blade Runner than Star Trek, or Futurama with its suicide booths, it is worth remembering that for the machines to appear, someone has to build them first. And if no-one wants them, they will not get built.

Put it this way: I've been involved with technology of one sort or another for forty-plus years, and I'm not the slightest bit concerned.

The Forbin Project is not even on the horizon.

(apols for a post filled with cultural references)


From what I remember the lost teenager hooks up with a family of Sikh blacksmiths to escape the urban madness. Changes was one of a number of very good dystopian sci-fi in the 70s and that one was at teenagers. It was a particularly British genre and made the future seem very frightening.

R4's public philosopher Michael Sandal had a discussion about AI with an audience of lay people from varied jobs and professions. Most had a high awareness of how it will change their jobs and they embraced it.
#515575
Weapons of mass destruction aside, I've never felt the techno-fear that some do. As well as the access to almost instant information that Malcolm describes, there's also that we have instant communication to people from all over the world. How much did a phone call to Australia cost 30 years ago? Now you can just fire up Skype, Whatsapp or whatever and gas on for as long as you want without worrying about a four digit phone bill. Brilliant.
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#515579
Its the world I dreamed of and it makes the world less lonely if you have more niche interests. And here is a social problem you can use the wired world to expand your knowledge and horizons or search for group think validation which has made conspiracy theorists, terrorists and political cranks who have been empowered by a little knowledge more dangerous.
#515581
D.C. Harrison wrote:Weapons of mass destruction aside, I've never felt the techno-fear that some do. As well as the access to almost instant information that Malcolm describes, there's also that we have instant communication to people from all over the world. How much did a phone call to Australia cost 30 years ago? Now you can just fire up Skype, Whatsapp or whatever and gas on for as long as you want without worrying about a four digit phone bill. Brilliant.
Oh yus.

I'm here in la France Profonde with two grandchildren, who have been keeping in touch (sparsely) with their respective families via Facetime. Brilliant. I've just been printing put some certificates of achievement for them recognising local fauna - pictures from the internet, printed via DTP. We've taken, edited and put on-line loads of digital pictures and videos. And, of course, I'm cyberchatting with you lot.

I quite like modern technology*. But later we get stories read from a proper book.


*By which I mean I absolutely love it and could do with even more.
#515588
I like it too, it helps me get through yet another interminably boring day in the world of insurance claims.

Otherwise I would have to derive mental stimulation from broken bogs, noise induced deafness, leaking roofs and so on....
#515632
Malcolm Armsteen wrote:I quite like modern technology*. But later we get stories read from a proper book.
Probably one of the few instances I still stick with the olden ways... can't really be having reading a book from a Kindle or whatever. Just doesn't feel right, somehow.

I still buy LPs and CDs too - hate downloading music. Without getting too Nick Hornby, I like that with all my albums, I can attach some memories around them, of when and where I was on purchasing it.
#515640
D.C. Harrison wrote:Weapons of mass destruction aside, I've never felt the techno-fear that some do. As well as the access to almost instant information that Malcolm describes, there's also that we have instant communication to people from all over the world. How much did a phone call to Australia cost 30 years ago? Now you can just fire up Skype, Whatsapp or whatever and gas on for as long as you want without worrying about a four digit phone bill. Brilliant.
Yeah that's not always a good thing I'm no technophobe, but I do feel that Siilcon Valley is full of people who to put it bluntly haven't got a clue about the real world.
#515646
youngian wrote:
Littlejohn's brain wrote: Siilcon Valley is full of people who to put it bluntly haven't got a clue about the real world.
They do know what technology the rest of the world can't do without two years before we do.
The fact that the person interviewed in the link above describes regularly people as normies says it all.

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