Area for all other political discussion
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
#499594
I ask this because I want to vomit every time I go on a newspaper comments section or Facebook. Are these people real? where does all this inane hatred come from? anti immigrants, anti Muslim, anti anyone even slightly to the left of Norman Tebbit

You will always find the odd right wing bell end in the pub, espousing such shite, but he will often get shouted down, I am worried that the quiet fella in the corner now thinks the same and goes home to similar shite on the internet

An awful lot of people now seem to treat political and social issues in the same way that a biased football fan does, pick a side then defend it regardless of whether or not it makes sense. The internet seems to have started a whole new trend for these pricks, who don't come out with their appalling views in the real world but snarl away behind a desk.

I think its getting worse, even cunts of the past, like Victorian mill owners would sometimes pay for things like parks, libraries and museums and so on, but todays cunts are just cunts, with no philanthropy at all.

The worst cunts though are the Sun reading cunts who believe the lies that the rich cunts tell them.

Everything is shit
#499599
I still see a stark contrast between 'internet people' and 'real life people'. Despite the increase in rabid hatred I've seen online over the past year that hasn't been reflected in day to day life. At all. I do agree, though, and sometimes I despair when I read the shit posted online. I'm just hoping it is still a small but embolden minority. It's getting harder to believe that, though.

I guess I do sort of cocoon myself in real life. My entire social circle and family, apart from perhaps 3 people, are either centre or left of centre. We do come across some of the gobby racist shites at times but they're always outnumbered and quickly told to sit down and shut up. Tolerance for these types are at an all time low and unless they can at least attempt to validate their views beyond "too many fuckin' immigrants here" they're dismissed. We're past the stage of trying to reason.

When you go online though it does feel very much like we've pretty much lost. It's not even the racism and hatred that gets me anymore. It's the utter fucking stupidity and rejection of facts. The morons screaming about Sadiq Khan "being silent" even though he's sat there on TV condemning terrorism. The insistence that Easter/Christmas/The tooth fairy is banned, despite all the overwhelming evidence right in front of their very eyes. The pride they take in dismissing experts who disagree with them, while simultaneously citing experts when they do agree with them. And Brexit. Just Brexit.

A few things still keep my positive. When it comes to online then Twitter, believe it or not, is one of them. I guess I'd be accused of using it as a "safe space" but I only tend to follow people who share my views. It's heartening. Then there's London which I spend a lot of time in - and seeing the way Londoners have reacted once again in the past few days, and the way they've strongly rejected the attempts by the likes of Hopkins to divide them.

And then there's something my dad told me before he died during one of our many debates (he was fairly right wing). He said it's just a cycle. The Right gain strength, seem to dominate for a while, and then take it too far and the populous recoil from it, making way for a bit of a resurgence of The Left. And round and round we go. I don't know if he was just trying to make me feel better or not...but I take comfort in it, especially now when it feels like we're well and truly out numbered and that 2016 was the year stupid won.
#499611
People don't like being duped, and they don't like having it pointed out to them that they have been duped.

A lot of the anger coming from the leave brigade, I suspect comes from them actually believing the lies and bullshit they were fed last year, and embarrassment at having their stupidity pointed out to them, with a side order of actually being slightly racist/xenophobic, but not wanting to admit to it.

I've not spoken to one person who has claimed they believed the side of the bus, or were swayed by the racist poster. And none of them have been able to give me a valid reason why they voted out.

Fact is, we know that millions of people were duped by the lies, because of the simple fact that they kept peddling them. We know that they were using analytics and data to sway people. Campaigns like this will have focus groups and feedback and all that. If these lies weren't hitting home, they would have switched to a message that was. If the research and data didn't tell them that a big fucking racist poster a couple of days before the vote wouldn't give them a spike at the right time, they wouldn't have gone out with a big fucking racist poster a couple of days before the vote.
#499612
In politics everything happens for a reason. If it happened, someone planned it.

The other thing the Leave voters didn't understand (still don't) is that they are dealing with people who are way cleverer and better informed than they are. They believe that their ignorance is universal.
#499619
I'd say that in a face to face discussion, the cuntery tends to get dialled back because the other person can interject, question, ask for clarification, punch you in the face and so on. Online however, one has the chance to rant and block out any disagreement.

As for Brexit, and for Trump for that matter, I think that a lot of the aggression comes from a nagging awareness that their victories were flukes and close-run ones at that, and that if there was a re-run, they probably wouldn't win again. Perhaps an inkling that they shouldn't have won, so make the most of it because it likely won't happen again.
#499624
Malcolm Armsteen wrote:
The other thing the Leave voters didn't understand (still don't) is that they are dealing with people who are way cleverer and better informed than they are. They believe that their ignorance is universal.
Once that cleverness is demonstrated they will be sneaky cunning foreigners taking dives and plotting against the English.


Its tricky for pundits and reporters to point someone's not too bright as it sounds churlish and patronising. It was only a two months ago they were hedging on Trump: "Don't underestimate him, he didn't get where he is by being an idiot."
But you don't even get that on Brexit: "Barnier and Merkel would do well not to underestimate May, Boris and Davis they'll take the EU to the cleaners," said no one ever. Apart from Andrew Neil who has lost the plot on Brexit by replacing journalistic rigour with wish fulfilment statements badly disguised as questions.
#499627
A basic rule of journalism (and media) is never insult the little guy - at least not directly. Sure, edit the clip to make him look stilted or ignorant, do everything you can to tell the readers/audience "laugh at this loser", but never state it out loud. Always profess to be on the side of the punter.

As for politicians, I think that the guy on the GQ clip (see the Trump presidency thread) put it best - running a country and running a company are two different things. They're being egged on by media organisations which are about the only remaining workplace where managers can strut about saying "Scram Jones, you're fired!", and who paint morons struggling with the enormity of tasks they're facing as somehow noble souls trying to cut through the crap.

There's always pleasure in watching an expert at work, making the difficult look easy*. Be it teaching, art, car repair, surgery, whatever - it's proof of study, practice and experience. Problem is though, morons look at that and think "Well, if they can do it so easily, how hard can it really be?". Hence their assertion that anything not involving physical exertion is somehow not real work.

*If anything, the one thing the Generation Game taught me.
#499639
Andy McDandy wrote:I'd say that in a face to face discussion, the cuntery tends to get dialled back because the other person can interject, question, ask for clarification, punch you in the face and so on. Online however, one has the chance to rant and block out any disagreement.

As for Brexit, and for Trump for that matter, I think that a lot of the aggression comes from a nagging awareness that their victories were flukes and close-run ones at that, and that if there was a re-run, they probably wouldn't win again. Perhaps an inkling that they shouldn't have won, so make the most of it because it likely won't happen again.
Hence the constant reference to "Remoaners" as some form of comfort blanket
#499645
And why the prospect of a second referendum (or even an MPs vote) so terrifies them, to the extent of trying to intimidate those who demand it into silence.

This is where I think Corbyn has found himself in over his head. I don't for one minute think he's anywhere near as nasty or calculating as some who would do this, as we can see with his second vote stuff. But I think his naivety to realpolitik has led to him effectively doing their bidding without them even asking with his not opposing the Article 50 bill stunt.

If that poll lead is accurate it wouldn’t […]

SPOTY

Sports Personality of the Year An old and tired f[…]

Liz Jones

A calibrated (sic) attack on Jo Cox by a lady who […]

News you won't see on the BBC

Was chatting with an old friend today, and we wang[…]