Area for all other political discussion
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By Malcolm Armsteen
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#548899
Oh, I take your point completely.

But I find it best to approach differences and anomalies with good-natured amusement. I love language(s) and all their little oddities.

Like, in what universe does [mh] = 'v' (Don't tell me. I know, really. My first degree was in history of English/language generally).
 
By Malcolm Armsteen
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#548903
One of the examples we (as students) were given of Grimm's Law was that modern Greek cats go 'Fiff'.

And possibly have a penchant for ghoti.

And then there's the Great European Vowel Shift - in case you wondered why the hat is a dArby and the rugby match between Oxford and Cambridge is the vArsity match.
 
By Malcolm Armsteen
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#548905
I recently discovered that in Dutch, chocolate spread is smeerenpaste. Gorgeous!

Because of the slight meaning drift of 'smear', of course. These shifts, changes and borrowings are the joy of language for me.
By Andy McDandy
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#548923
Looking at that list of internet funnies put up by KW, it occurs to me that there's only 3 or so "jokes" in there, just endlessly repeated, each time by someone thinking they're the first to make it.

Bit like, respectively, Richard Osman and Tyrion Lannister on tall and short people jokes.
 
By cycloon
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#548928
Languages are ace. The beautiful messes they make are so interesting, and 'yebbut Google translate' is another part of the same philistinism as those crap 'jokes' KW posted.

Learning Russian has taught me almost as much about English as Russian itself, and the 'dislocation' of really seeing how 'my' language is but one way to describe the world has a profound emotional and intellectual benefit, imo.

My dream project is now a dictionary of foreign words for emotions and states that English lacks.

/ramble
Malcolm Armsteen liked this
 
By cycloon
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#548931
Ta. I love the concept for the carrying one.

If nothing else, languages prove how infinitely messy and creative humanity is (and also how closely related we often are...) That should be celebrated. Not ignored because it's a headfuck that a character can be used differently to what you know. Lol random other people exist lol wut????
Last edited by cycloon on Thu Jul 19, 2018 4:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
By Kreuzberger
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#548932
MisterMuncher wrote:
Thu Jul 19, 2018 4:05 pm
Irish has single words for "a gap between showers", "a lanky and clumsy person" and "the amount of stuff that can be handily carried under one arm". Three to start you...
Scots put in a shift where the Queen's lets us down.

"a gap between showers" = pishin'
"a lanky and clumsy person" = glaiket (an adjective rather than a noun).
"the amount of stuff that can be handily carried under one arm" = not sure about this one but it doubtless involves avoiding the security guards at TK Maxx.
 
By MisterMuncher
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#548933
I've poorly described the lanky and clumsy one.

It specifically refers to someone who grew rapidly in their youth, and such a rate that their coordination never caught up, and it is this disparity between mental and physical sizing that causes their problem.

Which is a very odd thing to need a single word to describe.

From memory, and this may be sketchy, but the Irish word storc, usually translated as bullock, can also translate as "one so hard working and determined that they die standing up". What the actual fuck was going on here a few hundred years ago?
 
By Kreuzberger
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#548934
Malcolm Armsteen wrote:
Thu Jul 19, 2018 12:03 pm
I recently discovered that in Dutch, chocolate spread is smeerenpaste. Gorgeous!

Because of the slight meaning drift of 'smear', of course. These shifts, changes and borrowings are the joy of language for me.
German has a similar verb, schmieren. As well as meaning to smear, it is also shorthand for making up some sarnies or rolls.

Soll ich was für dich schmieren? Literally, "shall I smear something for you?"

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