Area for all other political discussion
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By visage
Membership Days Posts
#554859
I'm after advice. I'm a middle aged guy, intelligent (Oxford graduate), politically engaged. I'm in touch with the issues of the day, I absorb the ideas surrounding the issues. I see people who, with all due respect, subsume intelligence in favour of dogma or tribalism.

I want to contribute. I want to move beyond pithy retorts on social media. But where do I go?

Historically my natural home is Labour, but, for reasons I shouldn't need to expand on, that's not going to happen.

So what can I do? How can I advocate for enlightened policy making, a more politically informed populace and a more functional political class without hitching my wagon to a party I don't believe in?

This isn't a baseless rant. It's a realisation that action is needed, and helplessness is no longer an excuse....

Any ideas?
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#554868
So what can I do? How can I advocate for enlightened policy making, a more politically informed populace and a more functional political class without hitching my wagon to a party I don't believe in?


You may once have wanted to be a BBC correspondent but unfortunately, its now an organisation whose top paid political interrogator knows more about water divining than Brexit. And believes in both.
#554883
The SNP are deeply tribal now, too. They have immersed themselves in the easy tribal politics of England-bashing via the cybernats and now too in the cesspit of Scottish football rivalry where more politics is the last thing we need.

There is another way, however. Single, rational conversations, held in small groups which don't necessarily require the end game of a once-every-five-years vote. Tantric politics, if you will. Calmly debating and reaching some kind of consensus upon what works best for communities and the individuals that both sustain them and drive them forward, and for those too who, for myriad health, financial or educational reasons, can't contribute to that energy. Not yet, at least.

Sahra Wagenknecht of Die Linke is spearheading something similar here in DE with Aufstehen (Rise). Without question, this is dinner-party chat and graveyard TV but, the thing is, it has got people talking. Those conversations become public debate, and that debate becomes political vision. That's the theory, anyway.

If the Westminster political model is broken, imagine how we feel when our constitutionally cemented PR system is also perhaps fatally fractured and coagulates around short-term gains and furious "concerns", as the brown shirted mob characterise the fears they sow!

And, as the notion of new-way politics begins to gain traction in GB once more, a big tent approach which would include, for starters, the Greens and the LibDems looks to be a conversation worth joining.
youngian, Timbo liked this
#554904
I once met a fan of that. Raved about kibbutzim and how he'd had an amazing experience working on one and if we just copied it...

Pointed out that they only work due to their size and if they were any larger you'd get communication breakdown or be forced to impose control systems that would negate their beneficial effects.

He went back to "Yeah, but they're really good...".
 
By Catkins
Membership Days Posts
#555000
I feel your pain. I helped at the recent local elections in London as there were good local Labour Council candidates who needed leafletters. But if a general election were called tomorrow I'd hide from the local organiser!

What I've done is try and get involved in single-issue things I'm interested in. I've represented disabled people who've lost their ESA and PIP at first tier tribunals - the entire system is dreadful and I can't change that but I've taken the attitude that I can fix some people's problems one at a time. Better than nothing, and every case I win helps screw the DWP stats a bit more. :twisted:

Achieving something, or contributing to sane policy making is going to have to be done outside the main political parties for the time being.
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#555517
Exclusive: 58% Of Voters Would Back New Party, Poll Reveals
HuffPost UK survey finds 42% of people identify as centrists, not right or left wing.

A majority of voters are prepared to abandon old allegiances and back a new political party, a poll commissioned by HuffPost UK reveals.

As Brexit continues to tear Labour and the Conservatives apart, our poll found 58% would consider backing a new force in British politics at the next election.

Of more than 1,000 people polled by BMG, 42% also said they identify as centrists, rather than varying degrees of left (30%) or right wing (27%).

https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/ ... d5f9d33b5a


The many people I've met who call themselves middle of the road or centrists are people who don't like to break cover and when they do they hold bigoted opinions but don't consider them extreme (Farage's moderate decent people). The party these respondents claim they'd back if formed will contain no one they have heard of and will forget about this party's existence by the end of the week.
 
By cycloon
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#555527
youngian wrote:
Mon Oct 01, 2018 1:40 pm
Exclusive: 58% Of Voters Would Back New Party, Poll Reveals
HuffPost UK survey finds 42% of people identify as centrists, not right or left wing.

A majority of voters are prepared to abandon old allegiances and back a new political party, a poll commissioned by HuffPost UK reveals.

As Brexit continues to tear Labour and the Conservatives apart, our poll found 58% would consider backing a new force in British politics at the next election.

Of more than 1,000 people polled by BMG, 42% also said they identify as centrists, rather than varying degrees of left (30%) or right wing (27%).

https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/ ... d5f9d33b5a


The many people I've met who call themselves middle of the road or centrists are people who don't like to break cover and when they do they hold bigoted opinions but don't consider them extreme (Farage's moderate decent people). The party these respondents claim they'd back if formed will contain no one they have heard of and will forget about this party's existence by the end of the week.
Yah, I'm wary of 'centrist' identification.

1) It's used by anyone of further left/right to mean anyone not sufficiently bloody-minded
2) It's also a nice word for people to say to themselves rather than examining what they actually are.
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