Discussion of the more serious side of the Mail's agenda
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By youngian
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#349846
A return of an old favourite from the 80s
Primary school removes Enid Blyton Famous Five children's classics so it could win a race equality award
The Famous Five classics were dumped because they had 'inappropriate ethnic stereotypes' with references to gypsies, golliwogs and a dog with a name starting with 'N'.

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I would assume that copies containing that sort of language were updated years ago and they have some very old books in their library.

Comments are on the verge of satire of course
Bellydancer57, Hull, United Kingdom, 1 hour ago
Pathetic. Enid Blyton is as much a part of this country's history as any other 'politically incorrect' era. the Black and White Minstrel show and Golliwogs on jars, were just another era. Soon we will not be able to read or say anything for fear of offending someone. There are lots of things in this world I am offended by, but I am white, English, female and heterosexual, so my opinions mean nothing.
By Lord Brett
Membership Days Posts
#349847
As one of Mailwatch's resident library employees I thought I'd look out for paragraph nineteening, as it sounded so unlikely - we keep a decent selection of Blyton and new copies are bought in regularly. They tend to be read by ladies of a certain age, rather than the intended yound readership.

Anyway, the story is too short to have 19 paragraphs, but they key sentence is the following:
Deputy head Phil Clarke said many of the culled books had been replaced with edited versions
In other words, Enid Blyton isn't banned at all and the headline is very misleading.

There's a shock, eh readers!
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#349860
Lord Brett wrote:I don't have a problem with that description of her, but she doesn't seem very relevant to todays children.
I suppose tastes are cyclical but Harry Potter strikes me as a bizarre throwback to that era of patronising upper middle class storytelling of Enid Blyton.
Andy McDandy wrote:They have been regularly updated over the years to reflect current fashions. Not news.
But as you can see from the posts this is all politically correct Marxist whitewashing of an era when Britain was great, bobbys rode bicycles, comedians were funny and there were no foreigners mugging people.

Although what they would make of Geoffry Trease's Bows against the Barons I don't know
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By Andy McDandy
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#349862
Don't be fooled with HP. The boarding school setting took in many, including the Mail. One of the reasons why they turned on her so viciously when she turned out to be One Of Us.
By Fozzy
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#349865
Bellydancer57, Hull, United Kingdom, 1 hour ago

There are lots of things in this world I am offended by, but I am white, English, female and heterosexual, so my opinions mean nothing.
Sorry, Bellydancer, persecution fail in Mailite terms. Those dreadful PC leftists would still pander to you because of your gender. Now, if you could have claimed to be male, you would have got a full house.
By Fozzy
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#349867
youngian wrote:I suppose tastes are cyclical but Harry Potter strikes me as a bizarre throwback to that era of patronising upper middle class storytelling of Enid Blyton.
Certainly not. Why, Rowling actually has forrins, and brown ones at that, in the school; has her hero lusting after a Chinese girl; goes in for dreadful subversive concepts such as elf (for elf, read "slave") rights; and the entire series is built on a fight to prevent the bad guys taking over and in effect imposing a "Final Solution" on Muggles (aka Jews/blacks/other forrin undesirables). You don't find any of that subversive stuff in Blyton.
#349869
Fozzy wrote:
youngian wrote:I suppose tastes are cyclical but Harry Potter strikes me as a bizarre throwback to that era of patronising upper middle class storytelling of Enid Blyton.
Certainly not. Why, Rowling actually has forrins, and brown ones at that, in the school; has her hero lusting after a Chinese girl; goes in for dreadful subversive concepts such as elf (for elf, read "slave") rights; and the entire series is built on a fight to prevent the bad guys taking over and in effect imposing a "Final Solution" on Muggles (aka Jews/blacks/other forrin undesirables). You don't find any of that subversive stuff in Blyton.
Yes and Harry's closes minded reactionary uncle is a mail reader
 
By Ebon Badger
Membership Days
#349874
I've never read Blyton's books and neither has anyone else I know. They've all read The Hobbit though, and most have read the Narnia series and stuff by Beatrix Potter. Alice in Wonderland seems to be widely read as well. Blyton is not a classic in the way I would use the term i.e. widely read and enjoyed by several generations long after it was first released. By the sound of things her work has not aged well.
By Andy McDandy
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#349876
If anything, Blyton stamped herself on the public consciousness through ubiquity. She churned out books at such a rate of knots, she just steamrollered into the bookshops and libraries.

It's (despite updates as mentioned) not aged well, and is probably the source material for every parody (Daisy Pulls It Off, Five Go Mad in Dorset etc) of children's literature you can think of. But she used racist terms (and don't get me started on 'oh it was just that sort of time and place', the N word was always loaded with perjorative or patronising tones) and had golliwogs so in the eyes of some that's all that matters. Says to me that they care more about that than any sense of quality or even nostalgia.
By ACG
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#350101
I think some of Blyton's ideas have survived fairly well as franchises based on the core concepts. Noddy books, cartoons, and the like are still being churned out, but that's just the characters and setting, not her actual stories. Same is true of the Famous Five though less so, I remember a version being on when I was small which was ok, but it was basically just some kids and a dog having adventures, rather than adaptations of the books.

I think the ideas will continue to hang around, but I can't imagine any children who would really enjoy the original books all that much.
By shyamz
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#350104
Bellydancer57, Hull, United Kingdom, 1 hour ago
There are lots of things in this world I am offended by, but I am white, English, female and heterosexual, so my opinions mean nothing.
Well I'm a white half-English female heterosexual as well Bellydancer, but I'm not as bitter and pathetic as you clearly are.

It is usually the men you hear making these "but I'm just a straight white English man so no one cares" comments, but either way they are no less deluded.

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