Discussion of the more serious side of the Mail's agenda
:grinning: 100 %
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By Messianic Trees
Membership Days Posts
#410891
The Mail has decided to celebrate St George's Day by trolling it's own readers:

Not so quintessentially English! Fish and chips, polo and St George among the things that DIDN'T actually originate in Britain
Fish and chips has believed to be partly Portuguese and partly Belgian
The tea bag was accidentally invented by a New York tea merchant
Saint George himself is thought to have been born in Syria


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/artic ... z3Y8ttLEtx" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Victory, Englisc, United Kingdom, 6 hours ago
Is this the way the press celebrate St George's day with an English bashing story. Any way Happy St George's d Day. Born English by the Grace of God.
Dave the rave, Jersey
Just scoured the BBC news web site not a thing about St George's day, even though the English make up over 80% Of the population of the UK, and yet they go nuts on St Patrick's day, if anything proves the absolute anti English agenda of the BBC this does.
P202, London
I've been wondering when ANY reference would be made to St George's Day and here it is tucked away in a sneering niche that DM does so well. No reference on radio, none - as far as I have seen - on any T.V channels (despite the compulsory media tax).
Flak88, London, United Kingdom
This is just another article trying to convince us we don't exist as a people and should just accept being replaced. Every single nation on earth was created by people that migrated there, all those nations are allowed to be a people, seems that we are the only country that isn't. I don't agree so will be voting UKIP.
Scot Free, England, Canada
Coming on Saint Patricks Day, an article on how Saint Patrick wasn't Irish but Welsh, oh but it doesn't work that way does it, its only 'acceptable' to bash and smear England and the English, disgusting.
TaxiDriverDave, Benidorm, Spain
HAPPY ST GEORGES DAY TO THE ONLY M1GR4NT WHO WE DONT WANT D3P0RT3D! VOTE UKIP!
 
By Safe_Timber_Man
Membership Days Posts
#410893
Messianic Trees wrote:The Mail has decided to celebrate St George's Day by trolling it's own readers:

Not so quintessentially English! Fish and chips, polo and St George among the things that DIDN'T actually originate in Britain
Fish and chips has believed to be partly Portuguese and partly Belgian
The tea bag was accidentally invented by a New York tea merchant
Saint George himself is thought to have been born in Syria

Dave the rave, Jersey
Just scoured the BBC news web site not a thing about St George's day, even though the English make up over 80% Of the population of the UK, and yet they go nuts on St Patrick's day, if anything proves the absolute anti English agenda of the BBC this does.

Image


Hmmmm.....

Is he fucking stupid?
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#410895
http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/572408 ... lish-pride" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
In a St George's Day briefing, the party's culture spokesman Peter Whittle criticised the "self-loathing" attitude of some English people to "benign patriotism."

He spoke of Emily Thornberry's tweet in the Rochester and Strood by-election campaign, where she tweeted a photo of a house draped in St George's Cross flags with a white van outside it with the caption: "Image from #Rochester."

Ms Thornberry who was branded a snob and the controversial image ultimately led her resignation.
Can you be a self-loathing snob?
 
By Killer Whale
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#410898
Messianic Trees wrote:
Dave the rave, Jersey
Just scoured the BBC news web site not a thing about St George's day, even though the English make up over 80% Of the population of the UK, and yet they go nuts on St Patrick's day, if anything proves the absolute anti English agenda of the BBC this does.
Found this: http://www.bbc.co.uk/cymrufyw/32383323" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

BTW, Dave, Jersey's not in England, it's in Normandy. :roll:
 
By Cyclist
Membership Days Posts
#410957
On my way to the pub at 10 to 9 last night there were a lot of very drunk people waving their arms around and shouting. The town centre was full of 'em. If getting disgustingly drunk and making an arse of yourself is the correct way to "celebrate your Englishness" then the whole thing wants banning. It was every bit as bad as whenever In-ger-lund get knocked out of a major foopball competition :roll:
 
By Daley Mayle
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#410968
Here's a question for m'learned virtual chums here on Mailwatch.

The plays what Shakespeare wrote were written in 16th century English and his works have been translated and published around the world. Some of the words Bill used have long since fallen into disuse and his dialogue construction, though worthy, have likewise disappeared.

When translated does the translator use their own version of 16th century language?

Don't forget that Shakespeare died on his birthday. Bit of a pisser that for his friends and relatives; one hopes they kept the receipts for any gifts.
 
By Kreuzberger
Membership Days Posts
#410971
Daley Mayle wrote:...
When translated does the translator use their own version of 16th century language?
In my limited experience, it is not cut and dried.

I saw Hamlet last summer (nice, open-air, beer & sausages) and that was translated in to the very formal Hochdeutsch which would have been instantly recognisable to Schiller or Goethe.

On the other hand, a production of Romeo & Juliet (posh theatre, velvet and red wine) featured a lot more contemporary street-slang and was in keeping with the gang culture of the original context.

Just another leaf of the artichoke that is/was Shakespeare's genius - it works in any language, any paradigm and at any time right up to the present day.
 
By Killer Whale
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#410974
Literary Welsh is still recognisable as the language of the first Bible (William Morgan 1588, so contemporaneous with Shakespeare), so translation pretty much automatically would be into a version of the language that is, in a way, both old and contemporary.

It's only really in the last generation or so that serious writers have been (on occasion) writing in 'spoken' rather than literary Welsh, and I'm unaware (though it's not really an area of interest) of a translation of Shakespeare.
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