Discussion of article from the Mail's columnists and RightMinds contributors
:sunglasses: 66.7 % :grinning: 11.1 % 😟 11.1 % :shit: 11.1 %
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By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#499254
Rod fancies himself as popular music cultural commentator
Chuck Berry was far greater than David Bowie or Lou Reed

Belatedly, goodnight to Chuck Berry. Almost everything that has been worthwhile in rock music for 60-odd years has derived from his clever, knowing, mix of cracker-country and black blues.

Most of the guitar solos you ever heard had their roots in that raucous and effective two string – E and b – chiming of Chuck’s: ‘like he was ringin’ a bell.’ I can’t think of anyone who was more influential within the confines of that most conservative of mediums, rock n roll. Dylan, maybe, later, I’d grant you. Berry took the best riffs from the dead old blues giants and made them effervesce, allied them to a country bass motif and invented a genre which appealed to black and white alike.

His passing hasn’t received a tenth of the attention which was jubilantly doled out to Mercury, Bowie, Reed. And yet his importance was indeed about tenfold of those others. Fiftyfold in the case of Mercury. Perhaps it was because Berry’s rock n roll was definitely blue collar. I can’t think of another reason. https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2017/03/c ... -lou-reed/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
I can and if Berry did receive ten times the attention of the said contemporaries Liddle would be wheeling out his 'rights for whites' article. Freddie Mercury- poncey middle-class art rock? Apart from an accidental novelty record in the UK about his ding-a-ling in 1973, Berry hadn't had a hit single for 55 years.
 
By Daley Mayle
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#499263
I'm sure all those named would acknowledge Berry as being a musical influence. There was also a strange omission by not including the Beatles who said that Berry was a major influence on them and, in turn, later influenced Bowie, Mercury and Reed.

Mind you, Liddle was still a kid when the Beatles split.
By Danson's Forehead
Membership Days
#499288
His passing hasn’t received a tenth of the attention which was jubilantly doled out to Mercury, Bowie, Reed. And yet his importance was indeed about tenfold of those others. Fiftyfold in the case of Mercury. Perhaps it was because Berry’s rock n roll was definitely blue collar. I can’t think of another reason.
How about that Chuck was 90 years old, and that some people thought that he was already dead?
 
By Cyclist
Membership Days Posts
#499289
Daley Mayle wrote:Anywhichwayup, as any fule kno rock and roll was invented in a moment of pure serendipity when the invention of the flux capacitor coincided with the derring-do of a white boy from 1985.
I'm obviously not just any fule becos this fule doesn't kno what you're talking about :?
 
By Bones McCoy
Membership Days Posts
#499294
youngian wrote:
Berry took the best riffs from the dead old blues giants
No Rod they were in their late 30s and early 40s whereas Berry was in his early 30s
Forget Rod's amateur music critique for a second (Parshole did it, how hard can it be?)


Here's Louis "King of the Jukebox" Jordan and his Tympany Five: [youtube]YEqiWTb-UWA[/youtube]

He has a good claim to being one of several Grandfathers of Rock&Roll.

In one of his lesser known songs we see the roots:
* Intro has Chuck Berry's guitar riff (In earlier recordings the riff s delivered by the horns)
* Verse melody and rhythym almost identical to Ike Turner / Jackie Brenston's Rocket 88 (but without his sax section).
* The concise "every verse a story" format that Chuck Berry was later renowned for.


You might be tempted to conclude that there's never anything completely new in popular music.
I prefer to take the "standing on the shoulders of giants" angle.

None of this explains how we ended up with Simon Cowell occupying Emperor Palpatine's chair.
 
By Daley Mayle
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#499295
There was a documentary series a few years back that charted the timeline of popular music going way back. An analogy would be building with bricks, each layer being topped by another and supporting the structure as it grows and no one person is responsible for a particular musical genre. Having said that, we own a debt of gratitude to black Americans.
 
By Cyclist
Membership Days Posts
#499296
Malcolm Armsteen wrote:Even I get that one.

Marty Mcfly
Of course! Marty McFly!

(thinks: Who the fuck is Marty McFly?)

Dayley's link to a site that's blocked by the MoD doesn't help much, either.

One must assume it's a reference to a film. I run out of fingers long before I reach the end of the list of popular films I have never seen. This is probably a reference to one of those.

So no, I still don't know what Dayley's on about.
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