For all other Mail-related topics
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
#362957
Bon viveur - pissed
Concerns for their health - with all the drugs and drink they're putting away, they might die soon, and we'll have to find someone else to sneer at
Exotic tastes - piss dungeon for starters
Gregarious - pissed
#362960
Spotted an instance of someone (Bob Crow, oddly enough) "quaffing" champagne.

Only undeserving socialists hypocritically "quaff" champagne. Anybody else just drinks it.
#362964
Another related to Bob Crow - 'Barons'. Either union or drug, both of which must be depicted as a Bad Thing.

It's only OK to refer to a newspaper magnate as a press baron if they're dead.

And regarding champagne, it's the default drink of the rich, sometimes served in cocktail form. While hairy arsed union barons and other jolly jumpers 'quaff' it, it will be more discreetly 'sipped' by delightful young gels and odious toffs (rich thicks who got where they did on Daddy's connections, nothing like the bulk of the editorial staff).

If you're reported as laughing while drinking, you may as well kill yourself now, you heartless bugger.
#363001
When something obstructs the light, or there's a power cut or some such, it always means that the area/room in question is plunged into darkness.
#363008
Under cover of darkness - at night

In the cold light of day - in daytime

Often seen in war reports as well.
#363054
Andy McDandy wrote:And in the course of any story concerning England or Manchester United, there will be a pun on the name of Wayne Rooney. It's convenient that his surname can be shortened so neatly, so we can be treated to 'It had to be Roo', 'We can Roo it', 'Roo's the daddy?', 'Roo-nited win the cup' etc.
Football coverage in the tabloids ought to have been used to identify spies during the cold war (if, indeed, it wasn't), because it's unintelligible to those who are not absolutely immersed in the culture of this country. I remember seeing a headline a few years ago, which went something like 'Fergie blasts lino after Gooners steal Cup thriller'. One can be very fluent in English without understanding a word of that headline. (My reflex, on reading the first three words, was to picture a pop star cleaning her floor with an industrial hose.) And yet it's aimed at readers without a sophisticated formal education. I suspect that almost every adult who has lived their whole life in this country would know the story was about a football match, in a knockout tournament, and probably would understand which teams were playing, who won, and that it was a close game which turned on a contested decision (which most could narrow down to a couple of possibilities). Show the headline to a non-resident learner of English, even an advanced one, and they will suppose it's about a theft and/or some kind of explosion.
#363057
According to a book I'm reading, sports journalism is built around a central conceit - that an event whose outcome is massively influenced by a) highly technical expertise and b) utterly random factors can be given a narrative format.

Rather than explain how conditioning or training can affect performance, or how 22 players and a bouncy ball make for countless permutations, it all boils down to superstition and simplicity - the winners had more heart, the losers were jinxed.

Coverage of sport people off the pitch is pure soap opera, from WAG lifestyles to dressing room bust-ups.
#363069
Andy McDandy wrote:According to a book I'm reading, sports journalism is built around a central conceit - that an event whose outcome is massively influenced by a) highly technical expertise and b) utterly random factors can be given a narrative format.

Rather than explain how conditioning or training can affect performance, or how 22 players and a bouncy ball make for countless permutations, it all boils down to superstition and simplicity - the winners had more heart, the losers were jinxed.

Coverage of sport people off the pitch is pure soap opera, from WAG lifestyles to dressing room bust-ups.
If you want to see how bad sports journalism can be look at Football 365 mediawatch page

http://www.football365.com/mediawatch" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
#363125
Tell your football-obsessed friends that it's a game of chance. They'll disagree so ask them why they haven't won the pools and match result bets over and over again.

I'm all for the thrills and the songs and the raw emotion but why one team won and the other lost is like analysing the turn of a card.
#363149
ezinra wrote:Football coverage in the tabloids ought to have been used to identify spies during the cold war (if, indeed, it wasn't), because it's unintelligible to those who are not absolutely immersed in the culture of this country. I remember seeing a headline a few years ago, which went something like 'Fergie blasts lino after Gooners steal Cup thriller'. One can be very fluent in English without understanding a word of that headline.
I must be one of them forrin spies then, cos that rubbish is completely unintelligible to me too. :lol:



<Psssst. The chrome hawk swims at daybreak> :wink:
#363151
Talking of spies:

Spooks - standard reference to spy types.

Funny People - Littlejohn reference to spy types.

KGB tactics - spy stuff done by people we don't approve of.

Oh-Oh-Heaven - standard headline for anything vaguely shiny and spy related, be it a Bond film, an actor therein snogging someone or wearing a particularly sharp suit, or a cool bit of spy stuff.
  • 1
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
Jeremy Corbyn.

I got briefly swept up by his Glastonbury appear[…]

That's the face of a man resigned to spending more[…]

In fairness to Mann, it's estimated that slightly […]

Brexit Fuckwit Thread

Austin Mitchell's latest. Germans are currency m[…]