Topics about a single subject's Daily Mail experience
:sunglasses: 50 % :grinning: 50 %
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#415379
I think it's when they use articles written for the paper paper, and for people who want to know what that is in the old money and don't want to know about metres or celsius. They don't read so well when placed on its vibrant thrusting mixed media platform (aka any old tat cobbled together by badly-paid interns).
#415381
Drones are another thing the D M is quite upset about. Perhaps that's the next campaign.

Burglars are buying drones to identify targets: Police fear gadgets are being used to take undetected surveillance photos of alarm systems and getaway routes
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... stems.html

As with a lot of their bugbear articles, taken in isolation it can appear quite reasonable but the sheer volume of 'X is a Very Bad Thing because Y' starts to seep in leaving you with this:
photoman, brighton, United Kingdom, 22 minutes ago
These drones are a real problem, ban them before it is too late.
+9 -1
Span Rudgoon, Not London, United Kingdom, 2 hours ago
If I see one of those flying above my gaff, the air gun is coming out.
+41 -4
Jim, Norwich, United Kingdom, 1 hour ago
A simple catapult can also be used to bring them down. Should you also find the culprit; the burglar with his FPV goggles on controlling his device, then a smart upwards movement with a pick axe handle between his legs will do the trick; makes the eyes water and the drones uncontrollable; it's the pain you see, not nice.
+36 -7
The ungagged, Bham, 23 minutes ago
If I see one over my garden I would love to shoot it down, whether it is a kids toy or not.
+5 -0
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#415384
Safe_Timber_Man wrote:Drones are another thing the D M is quite upset about.
Except when used to indiscriminately bomb the Muzzies.
Safe_Timber_Man wrote:
John, Sunderland, 1 hour ago
The best way to register your disaproval is to use them to price check an item. Just scan in a high value item such as a bottle of whiskey and then go and put it back on the shelf without cancelling it. The checkout needs to be reset and stock control thinks the bottle left the store. Complete your shopping in the staffed checkouts.
+33 -18
Absolute prick.
I wondered what became of the Metric Martyrs
Last edited by youngian on Tue May 19, 2015 10:10 am, edited 2 times in total.
#415387
Safe_Timber_Man wrote:Drones are another thing the D M is quite upset about. Perhaps that's the next campaign.

Burglars are buying drones to identify targets: Police fear gadgets are being used to take undetected surveillance photos of alarm systems and getaway routes
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... stems.html

As with a lot of their bugbear articles, taken in isolation it can appear quite reasonable but the sheer volume of 'X is a Very Bad Thing because Y' starts to seep in leaving you with this:
photoman, brighton, United Kingdom, 22 minutes ago
These drones are a real problem, ban them before it is too late.
+9 -1
Span Rudgoon, Not London, United Kingdom, 2 hours ago
If I see one of those flying above my gaff, the air gun is coming out.
+41 -4
Jim, Norwich, United Kingdom, 1 hour ago
A simple catapult can also be used to bring them down. Should you also find the culprit; the burglar with his FPV goggles on controlling his device, then a smart upwards movement with a pick axe handle between his legs will do the trick; makes the eyes water and the drones uncontrollable; it's the pain you see, not nice.
+36 -7
The ungagged, Bham, 23 minutes ago
If I see one over my garden I would love to shoot it down, whether it is a kids toy or not.
+5 -0
Although I'm quite aware of the falling price of technology after launch, I'd imagine that the bulk of domestic burglary is still carried out by opportunists and junkies. Who will have a) not much available cash, and b) more important things to spend money on. Like drugs.
#415457
MisterMuncher wrote:The Mail doesn't aim for real people, it's for broad demographic ideas, that they haven't updated. Hence once you hit 60, you start listening to Vera Lynn and fearing anything with more than two buttons.

Last month LiDL were selling cycling sunnies with a built in HD camera. My ould fella, the culchiest, most computer illiterate person I know bought a pair so he could record video when he was out with his horse (we bought him the beast for his 60th, he's wanted one all his life, his own dad having been a horse trader) to show his friends. If my Da is getting kitted out like Spider Jerusalem for 50 quid and change, technophobia is well dead.
I must report developing an inexplicable urge to Bayonet the Kaiser* during my 50th birthday party.

* Kaiser Bill of Berlin, not Franz Backenbaeur.
* If I were making a list of Football elder statesmen to bayonet Blatter and Platini would be near the top.
* Ohh Matron! I seem to have inadvertently invented a new wank euphemism.
#415507
Today it is smartphones.

SARAH VINE: Why smart phones should be illegal for under-16s
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/artic ... l-16s.html


Of course, the comments section is in full agreement. Some here may even agree. Personally, I think the Mail's constant calls for things to be banned is fucking ridiculous and completely goes against their narrative and sneering at other countries who have less freedoms than us.
 
By ezinra
Membership Days Posts
#415519
The LSE research that Vine is quoting comes to a completely different conclusion about the risks of children using smartphones out of school. One of the researchers writes:
In practice, smartphones seem to make little difference to the risks, although it does make it easier to access the internet away from the surveillance of parents. But perhaps the more striking result, as described in this blog, questions the assumptions of the levels of freedom children have to engage with the online world through smartphones and their ubiquitous use. … There are social and economic reasons why children do not use the devices ‘anytime, anywhere’ and in practice why they are not always ‘at hand’.
Banning smartphones in school serves a different purpose. One of the main problems is the amount of time that teachers waste investigating the use and abuse of phones, not just in class (eg during tests) but also in terms of complaints about phone-based pranks, theft, bullying, and so on. It's a good idea to make students leave their phones at the school gates, a stupid one to prevent them from learning how to use – and manage their use of – smartphones in their own time.
 
By Watchman
Membership Days Posts
#415525
[quote="Safe_Timber_Man"]Today it is smartphones.

SARAH VINE: Why smart phones should be illegal for under-16s
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/artic ... l-16s.html

...and didn't you know my husband can now "make all the laws" so I'll tell him to make it happen..........hurrah another successful crusade!
#415547
Innit strange that when it's something that only or mainly affects poor kids the answer is better parenting, but when it's a bit more class-independent, then it's time to ban sick filth. They are lazy and feckless, we are powerless in the face of a terrible world.
#417260
They're becoming a bit of a parody of themselves now with this campaign against everything automated.


Don't you just HATE self-service train tickets! They leave baffled commuters overcharged, on the wrong trains - and paying millions in unjust penalty fares...
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... fares.html
Sam . S, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 1 hour ago
They are designed to confuse passengers and generate more money for the train company. Legalised robbery.
+61 -3
Geoff Devon, East Devon, 2 hours ago
For a 75 year old the electronic age is a curse
+17 -3

Bit patronising to all the 75 year olds who can use a simple touch screen system, in my opinion.





And a nice picture of The Good Old Days for good measure:

Image


Lee, Crawley, 10 minutes ago
Yet another straight forward bit of technology confusing the average DM reader. I get the train every day, have done for many yes. There are many things wrong with the service, always late, often cancelled, always too packed - however these machines are simple, as is buying online. If you can't figure this stuff out then I expect you find everything you do a challenge, not just buying a train ticket
 
By ezinra
Membership Days Posts
#417279
I agree with the article, more or less. The ticket purchasing system in the UK is far too complicated compared with elsewhere in Europe, and while that's not the fault of the machines, they don't exactly help – the bit about not being able to buy a ticket for a journey that starts at Waterloo if you are still at Euston is ridiculous. But the main reason, not alluded to in the article, for this and the other absurdities of the British rail system is not mechanisation but privatisation.
DarrenWA12, St Helens, 33 minutes ago

Why complain now? Egged on by the Mail and the rest of the Tory press, you voted for all of this back in 1992.
3 1
And sometimes machines and private-sector priorities work together to complicate matters. A while ago I made an online reservation for a ticket to be collected from a machine on the day of my journey. But when I arrived at the station, the network was down. So I queued for 15 minutes to speak to the lone person in the ticket office, who told me just to get on the train and explain to the conductor. I did as he said, and the conductor, having lectured me quite aggressively for not buying a replacement ticket at the station, made me pay the full fare (about three times the price of the ticket I had reserved and already paid). He said I had seven days to go in person to a Southern Trains ticket office (I was in Scotland for five of those days) to get reimbursed. Fortunately I was able to do this, although it took 45 minutes. So for a matter that was completely the fault of the (South West Trains operated) ticketing network, I had to loan £50 to Southern Trains, with severe restrictions (and a load of hassle) on getting it back.

When the computer network is down at French train stations, everyone travels free.
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