Topics about a single subject's Daily Mail experience
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By Bones McCoy
Membership Days Posts
#514643
Arnold wrote:
So how on earth are we going to power nine million electric cars, asks ALEX BRUMMER


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/artic ... z4o14Kcsq8" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Where will they find the water for all these new-fangled taps?
Cholera from the village pump was good enough for poor old Grandma......
 
By Big Arnold
Membership Days Posts
#514644
Daley Mayle wrote:There was a really desperate and depressing take by BBC Breakfast a couple of years ago about electric cars and their inherent long-distance distance limitations, battery recharge time and a lack of power points. So what did they do? They decided to set an electric car a challenge on how long it would take to get from London to Scotland. It took days instead of hours, cue lots of Smirking on the Sofa at this silly leccy car idea.
Since then.
Electric car attempts London-to-Edinburgh in a day
Just three years ago, when I attempted the same journey in an electric Mini, it took four days.
robert llewellyn
I think the fact that it is now even theoretically possible is a big step
Robert Llewellyn, Actor and electric car enthuusiast
But, as predicted then, the technology has moved on significantly.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-25878172" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

It took 12 hours.
 
By Bones McCoy
Membership Days Posts
#514645
mr angry manchester wrote:Electric vehicles are new to anything but short range, short distance work. The only electric vehicles which have been used in any quantity were electric milk floats, which were intended for local milk deliveries in the morning, after which they returned to the depot and could spend the rest of the day on charge.

Electric buses were tried, of two types, trolleybuses, which had overhead wiring, doing away with the need for charging, but the overhead was complicated as it had to have two separate wires, a live pick up and an earth. Trains and trams only need one, as the track acts as the earth. The other type, which were experimented with were battery powered ones, Selnec PTE in Manchester tried one called the Seddon Chloride Silent Rider in the early 70s, it was tried on a route from Manchester to Stockport on peak hour services then went back to Hyde Road depot to be recharged during the day.

As the infrastructure to support the vehicles use on longer runs expands, ie more charging facilities, this disadvantage will die out
Electric delivery vans have been about for at least 5 years.
There are a small number of battery powered buses making their appearance here too.
Mostly on the short daytime routes that ferry retired folks to the nearby shopping centres.

Both differ little form the duty cycle of the old milk-floats.
Plenty of close range running followed by evening/night downtime to recharge.

Considering that most journeys are short range, I can see an opportunity for a sensibly priced "electric second car" design.
Stick in decent seating and storage for school runs, or trips to the supermarket, and it's a winner for 90% of urban journeys.
(Obviously rather less practical if you live on a Welsh hill-farm).


The only tenuous grip on reality that Brummer and his pals have is this.
The UK is shit at big project roll-outs.
Pick at least one of: Doesn't work right, very late, way over predicted cost.

I see no reason why a charging network won't suffer the same issues.
There's also the Brexit shaped elephant in the room.
Will Brexit make it harder for us to persuade German, French or Dutch state providers to build it for us?
 
By Daley Mayle
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#514651
Ready charged batteries that simply slot into place could do it.

- Batteries will soon be much smaller and more powerful. This happened with memory chips for computers that constantly increased in RAM and shrank in size and cost. A 16mb RAM upgrade for my first computer back in the early 1990s cost £25 per 4mb.
- The car you bought would already have have had such a rechargeable battery so there isn't a cost associated with such a system.
- Instead of petrol stations there would be battery stations.
- All cars would have a standardised battery compartments and the battery in the car would be mechanically removed and replaced. Size of battery and power would depend on type of car and there would be a choice of battery types.

Bleedin' obvious, really.
#514667
What about.....putting a sort of wire mesh grille thing up over every road, and metal plates on the road surface....then we could all drive dodgems!!

Sorted
 
By Big Arnold
Membership Days Posts
#514677
mr angry manchester wrote:What about.....putting a sort of wire mesh grille thing up over every road, and metal plates on the road surface....then we could all drive dodgems!!

Sorted
Or slots.

New electric Mini actually a giant Scalextric car


http://newsthump.com/2017/07/26/new-ele ... xtric-car/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
 
By Big Arnold
Membership Days Posts
#514678
Daley Mayle wrote:Ready charged batteries that simply slot into place could do it.

- Batteries will soon be much smaller and more powerful. This happened with memory chips for computers that constantly increased in RAM and shrank in size and cost. A 16mb RAM upgrade for my first computer back in the early 1990s cost £25 per 4mb.
- The car you bought would already have have had such a rechargeable battery so there isn't a cost associated with such a system.
- Instead of petrol stations there would be battery stations.
- All cars would have a standardised battery compartments and the battery in the car would be mechanically removed and replaced. Size of battery and power would depend on type of car and there would be a choice of battery types.

Bleedin' obvious, really.
A good idea in theory, but there are insuperable practical problems.

http://www.greencarreports.com/news/109 ... -heres-why" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
 
By Big Arnold
Membership Days Posts
#518511
Fighting Jaws was a doddle compared to mastering a self-service checkout! Roger Moore's last memoir revealed how modern life left him shaken and stirred

A) Most of the book was about self-service tills.
B) The Mail is riding one of its hobby horses again.
Answers on a postcard.
By Sir Roger Moore For The Daily Mail

:roll:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z4sBJKYEqB" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
 
By Big Arnold
Membership Days Posts
#538711
don't pay with contactless cards because I don't quite trust it, says the Bank of England's chief cashier whose signature is on every banknote
18 Feb 2018
And I do hear stories of friends - this is a personal anecdote, this isn't the official Bank view - whose money has been taken off contactless when you walk past something.
Tap-and-go' bank cards are so very convenient but read how fraudsters can steal your details just by standing close to you — and ask yourself... will you ever use contactless again?
3 April 2018

Last month Victoria Cleland, chief cashier of the Bank of England, whose signature is on every banknote, said: 'I do hear stories of friends — this is a personal anecdote, this isn't the official Bank view — whose money has been taken off contactless when you when you walk past something.
All anecdotal apart from one victim whose lost or stolen card was used. Theft not fraud.
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