For all print & online journalism
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#188516
An interesting, if hardly unbiased, piece on how lies are incorporated into articles. In this case, the cushy prisons meme.

http://www.newleftproject.org/index.php ... JQ.twitter" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


(H/T Daily Quail)
#188697
'The Year Journalism Changed'

http://www.bbc.co.uk/journalism/blog/20 ... hang.shtml" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
#188714
I used to work for the Prison Service so notice a lot of bollocks reporting of the sort discussed upthread.

The Chief Inspector of Prisons had criticised a prison (Shepton Mallett, I think) for having too many locked doors. It wasn't a ridiculous idea, because it was a Cat C prison where many inmates would be coming out soon. There was no Kenneth Noye in there.

Cue "look at those soft prison loonies! they're worried because prisons are too safe!"
#188927
The Red Arrow wrote:
I used to work for the Prison Service so notice a lot of bollocks reporting of the sort discussed upthread.
Me too.

Interesting- my time was 1999-2000, then some time in the Home Office. How about you?

I fortunately missed the biggest write in, re one of the Krays. Reggie, I think. He didn't get parole, though apparently the reasons given were very solid.
#194895
Here's a good piece about journalism and the use of statistics and numbers

http://www.journalism.co.uk/skills/how- ... 7/a547659/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
#194903
They were discussing this on Today when I got up thsi morning

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16783678" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Check out Ben Gummer at the bottom regarding the current scheme. It "fails the common sense sniff test". Have you heard anything more idiotic?

Regarding prisons he said that people were sick of hearing what a cushy number prisons were. Yeah? Well they wouldn't have to if you and your press friends stopped fucking lying about it, eh?

I assume that ex-prisoners will still be allowed to sit in the Lords though.
#237658
Following the exposure of Clive James' valedictory in the Mirror as being completely fabricated from quotes made in a different context, James discusses the nature of journalism in the Telegraph

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvan ... d-yet.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


The Greatest Living Australian wrote:Indeed there is only one leisured class I can think of, now that the old aristocracy must spend the winters working flat out to get their stately homes ready for the summer tourist season. The most flagrant leisure class in recent history consists, dare I say it, of a certain breed of journalists. There are hard-working journalists, but they are not writing pieces like my death-bed interview.

Journalists who write junk like that aren’t really working at all. As happens in Scoop, they take dull stuff out of one tray and brighten it up until it is ready to go into another tray, on its way to publication.
#237664
mojojojo wrote:They were discussing this on Today when I got up thsi morning

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16783678" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Check out Ben Gummer at the bottom regarding the current scheme. It "fails the common sense sniff test". Have you heard anything more idiotic?
.
Jeremy Hunt's failed that test recently.

It's not just losing your liberty, physical discomfort, lack of dignity with prison anyway. It's being in there with scary people- and they have those in all prisons, not just the top security ones. Ben Gummer would poo his pants.
#237700
Tubby Isaacs wrote:
The Red Arrow wrote:
I used to work for the Prison Service so notice a lot of bollocks reporting of the sort discussed upthread.
Me too.

Interesting- my time was 1999-2000, then some time in the Home Office. How about you?

I fortunately missed the biggest write in, re one of the Krays. Reggie, I think. He didn't get parole, though apparently the reasons given were very solid.
I spent 2001-2005 as an OSG. Met some interesting people, but glad to be out of it. Every ex-colleague I've met since has told me I did the right thing getting out.
#250513
George Monbiot has a very interesting blog entry at the Guardian:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/g ... -interests" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

He uses a piece by Magnus Linklater to illustrate how journalists need to be made to declare an interest in stories they publish.
This, to me, touches on a wider problem with journalism. It claims to hold other people to account (it often does so capriciously, concentrating on the sins of the underclass and those who challenge wealth and power, rather than those of the billionaire class for whom most journalists work). But it is itself almost completely unaccountable. Few journalists provide references for their claims, so that readers can judge for themselves whether they are accurately representing the facts. Fewer still show where their own economic interests lie: whether or not, in other words, they are the disinterested commentators they purport to be.
Well, yes, we know. But it's good to see the point of view entering the mainstream - perhaps it should have been flagged up for Brian?
#273884
The creator of Regret the error, an American website which writes about ethics in journalism, posted an interesting blog about:
the principles that underpin ethical behavior in the profession, and how journalism ethics can and should evolve.

Rather than focusing on the usual concepts of accuracy, transparency and accountability, I found myself thinking more about humility, honesty, fairness, empathy and vulnerability.
I attempted to address the human aspect during my panel by using a word that rarely shows up in discussions about journalism: vulnerability.
Humans connect through vulnerability. News organizations should show vulnerability in order to connect, says @craigsilverman #PoynterEthics

— Erica Berger (@GoodBerger) October 23, 2012
To admit your errors is to show vulnerability. To show vulnerability is to enable yourself to be really seen. Our flaws are what connect us, not perfection. It’s true for humans, and that’s why it’s true for journalists and news organizations.
If we as journalists don’t own up to our mistakes, we don’t seem human and break trust, @CraigSilverman #poynterethics
— Meghan Peters (@petersmeg) October 23, 2012
Some of the links from the symposium are worth a read, too.
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