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By Andy McDandy
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#629663
Starting to?

I noticed the change in coverage of the day starting in about 1994, with the 50th anniversary of D-Day. Original plans for the event were quite light-hearted (spam fritter eating contests and suchlike) until they were hastily revised to something more respectful and sombre.

The next big shift in treatment of the day was, unsurprisingly, over the period between 9/11 and 7/7. What I saw as the difference was the way the war on terror was sold. Previously, the Falklands, Bosnia, Gulf War 1, had been depicted as limited in scope and involvement. They were Our Boys for sure, but doing a specific task and there was a general acceptance that whatever the crimes of Hussein, or Galtieri, there was no real animosity to the average person on the streets of Baghdad or Buenos Aires.

Afghanistan and Iraq 2 were different. There was, in the press, a visceral loathing for the enemy. They were dirty, subhuman, barbaric. "Why are our guys out there?" was asked a lot, but not out of a pacifistic urge. It was more like "Ungrateful bastards don't even want to be civilised". In a way, the enemy was as much the "soft" people at home as it was the Taliban or insurgents.

To a point I can understand. Both Iraq 1 and the Falklands were stand-up fights against enemies in uniform, with the rules of war being largely kept to. Both had clear moral strength - liberating conquered people from an aggressive neighbour, with broad international backing. I feel that when Britain decided to go into Iraq without much of a leg to stand on, a line was crossed. Somewhere in the collective consciousness, we went "Fuck it". It's the bit in the film where the cop throws his badge away and goes full vigilante, killing anyone who looks at him funny.

And so the tone around remembrance day changed. The poppy thugs are essentially making a little list of those to bully. People with wrong opinions. People with glasses. Clever people. Queers. People who get all offended and that. People who think they're fucking smart or something. Weirdoes. People who are soft as shite. People who want a good kicking. There's something pathetic and crabbed and miserly about it, and to be honest has moved in those peoples' heads from remembering the dead or why they fought, into a lairy celebration of That Time We Kicked Some Heads In.
 
By davidjay
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#629845
Boiler wrote:
Wed Nov 11, 2020 1:07 pm
I see the tiresome twats of Extinction Rebellion decided to hijack Armistice Day at the Cenotaph.

They're becoming as tedious with their stunts as Fathers4Justice.
That's what you get when you have a cause, no matter how noble, run by people who give every impression of being spoilt brats.
 
By Boiler
Posts
#629852
It *genuinely* pains me to say this, but it might have driven the message home if that instance where several protesters dragged from the roof of a Tube train were saved from a serious beating only by the intervention of a group of women had nonetheless had the living shit kicked out of them.

Trouble is, that would have made them martyrs. I don't like violence at all. But, sometimes... spoilt children with nothing better to do with their lives do need teaching a lesson.
 
By Andy McDandy
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#629861
Just before the 2003 invasion of Iraq I attended a public meeting hosted by a bunch of upper middle class students in Stroud. It became very clear that rather than a discussion of the war and whether we were right to go in (and for the record I was anti-war), this was more of a love-in and celebration of their sterling work protesting, by which I mean showing their bums to some bored RAF Regiment guards at RAF Kemble.

Some years later I noticed that those involved in Led by Donkeys were from that part of the world, and I'd not be surprised if they were the same rich kids playing at revolution.
 
By davidjay
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#629863
Andy McDandy wrote:
Wed Nov 11, 2020 2:57 pm
Just before the 2003 invasion of Iraq I attended a public meeting hosted by a bunch of upper middle class students in Stroud. It became very clear that rather than a discussion of the war and whether we were right to go in (and for the record I was anti-war), this was more of a love-in and celebration of their sterling work protesting, by which I mean showing their bums to some bored RAF Regiment guards at RAF Kemble.

Some years later I noticed that those involved in Led by Donkeys were from that part of the world, and I'd not be surprised if they were the same rich kids playing at revolution.
Led By Donkeys were humourous and got their message across without alienating the very people they wanted onside, so probably not.

I gave up on XR when they did a rush hour protest on the busiest junction in Birmingham and said that all the inconvenienced motorists they spoke to understood, which is unlike any other group of inconvenienced rush hour motorists I've ever known.
Last edited by davidjay on Thu Nov 12, 2020 7:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
bluebellnutter, Oblomov liked this
 
By Bones McCoy
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#629932
Malcolm Armsteen wrote:
Wed Nov 11, 2020 10:19 pm
The Red Arrow wrote:
Wed Nov 11, 2020 10:01 pm
This turned up on another forum, via an American. Just needs a Wink Martindale 'Deck of Cards' voice-over.

Image
Why are Americans such credulous halfwits? Serious question.
Take a look at who's been in charge.
 
By The Red Arrow
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#630018
Update: He's been very politely put right by a pair of Canucks.
I have 33 years in the Canadian Army (retired a few years ago).
*******'s article judging from the description of the poppy sounds like it came from the Brit side given the mention of 'green' elements. The Canadian poppy pin generally only has a black center. That being said I've never heard of that description of the various elements (and I've worked with quite a few Brits over the years including Remembrance Day ceremonies at Anzio). I'm not disputing the article but am guessing it's probably apocryphal given ---------'s history lesson which is well known in Canada.
All that to say that you will not offend any veteran by wearing the poppy on the left or not wearing it at 1100hr posn etc. You certainly will make a veteran happy by simply wearing a poppy...period.
Saved me wading in and others having to explain quaint English phrases like "right load of bollocks". :D
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