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By Tubby Isaacs
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#239392
You know those striking things Rowan Williams said about Islam? He didn't mean them- he was summarising someone else's views.

http://www.islamophobia-watch.com/islam ... slims.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

This is what he said
Liberal commentators properly concerned to combat anti-Muslim prejudice (Nick Cohen, for example, in an article in the New Statesman of October 1st) persist in assuming that Islam is a set of convictions in the mode of much modern Christianity. To suggest that the Muslim owes an overriding loyalty to the international Muslim community, the Umma, is worrying; it is a factor in Muslim identity (say the liberal commentators) that intensifies suspicion towards the Muslim community in a quite unnecessary way. What is desirable is thus for Muslims to make clear that their loyalty is straightforward modern political loyalty to the nation state, unaffected by the private convictions that individual Muslim believers happen to hold in common.
http://www.archbishopofcanterbury.org/a ... am-lecture" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Shameful, shit stuff from the Observer.
By new puritan
Membership Days Posts
#329883
Nasty little hatchet job here on Paul O'Grady. Did he turn them down for an interview or something?

http://www.theguardian.com/theobserver/ ... aul-ogrady" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
A millionaire several times over, who lives in a large house on a generous plot of land in the Kent countryside, O'Grady still considers himself to be working class, a point he emphasised several times in the first section of his two-part film. His insistence raises a couple of intriguing questions. Was it his background that was deemed the necessary qualification to make the film? Or was it his continuing identification, despite his radically changed material circumstances, with his humble roots?

These are not idle speculations, because the resulting film was an unstructured mishmash of sentimental memories, saccharine cliches and oddly unsupported opinion. Certainly, the two academics involved in research were sufficiently disappointed with the outcome to ask that their names be removed from the credits.
The academics (there were actually three of them) didn't pull out because of O'Grady, they pulled out because the BBC editors neutered the programme by refusing to let them say positive things about council housing.
O'Grady waxed nostalgic about the miners, because they did a tough job in backbreaking conditions, but could scarcely conceal his condescension towards young call-centre workers in bright, comfortable offices who failed to see themselves as working class. The staggering presumption of a multimillionaire romanticising the community-strengthening harshness of mining while trying to instil a sense of class consciousness in a group of modestly paid but apparently contented office workers seemed lost on O'Grady.
"Modestly paid but apparently contented"? I know a few people who do or have done call centre work and I'm pretty sure they'd describe themselves as neither. Call centre work is shit.
By Lord Brett
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#329893
new puritan wrote:Nasty little hatchet job here on Paul O'Grady. Did he turn them down for an interview or something?

http://www.theguardian.com/theobserver/ ... aul-ogrady" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
A millionaire several times over, who lives in a large house on a generous plot of land in the Kent countryside, O'Grady still considers himself to be working class, a point he emphasised several times in the first section of his two-part film. His insistence raises a couple of intriguing questions. Was it his background that was deemed the necessary qualification to make the film? Or was it his continuing identification, despite his radically changed material circumstances, with his humble roots?
Oh god, not that shite again. Apparently to hold any sort of socialist of left wing views you must have no material posessions and live in a cave. It's disgraceful that The Observer is coming out with that sort of Tory wank.
By new puritan
Membership Days Posts
#329898
If you proclaim yourself as a socialist, it's hard to be accepted as being genuine in your convictions. If you're working-class, you're uppity and probably a bit dim. If you're middle-class, you're naive or possibly some sort of sinister subversive. The liberal press is as prone to making these attacks as the Tory press, unfortunately.
 
By Tubby Isaacs
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#329905
O'Grady waxed nostalgic about the miners, because they did a tough job in backbreaking conditions, but could scarcely conceal his condescension towards young call-centre workers in bright, comfortable offices who failed to see themselves as working class. The staggering presumption of a multimillionaire romanticising the community-strengthening harshness of mining while trying to instil a sense of class consciousness in a group of modestly paid but apparently contented office workers seemed lost on O'Grady.
Christ.

I can't be bothered with that.
By Carlos The Badger
Membership Days Posts
#329943
They did publish this, though.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfre ... ss-britain

So, one piece by an informed academic that seems to know what she's talking about; and the other by a jumped up TeeVee reviewer who's got previous form for talking out of his arse!
By new puritan
Membership Days Posts
#333511
Was Cohen pissed when he wrote this?
It would be dishonest of me to try to out-Jew Ed Miliband. What's the point? We are both the children of Marxist atheists with no connections to religious Judaism. I wouldn't even raise the Jewish question if Ed Miliband did not keep trying to remind us of his link to the horrors of the Holocaust.
If leftists still imagine that the anti-war sentiment is a blessing, they should notice its links to anti-immigrant sentiment. Just as the worse Assad behaves towards Syrians the less willing the public is to confront him, so the worse the government behaves towards immigrants the more the public likes it. After the coalition sent vans on to the streets telling illegal immigrants to get out, people like me protested that this was the type of stunt you saw in tinpot dictatorships. The pollsters at YouGov found that the voters liked the look of a tinpot country and support for ministers increased.
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfre ... al-courage" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

A smidgen of humility from the Eustonites would be welcome, given the disasters they've helped drag us into over the last ten years. The foot-stamping over the last week has been beyond pathetic and embarrassing - this is the first time they haven't got their way in years and still the toys have come right out of the pram.
By new puritan
Membership Days Posts
#340717
Fancy doing a little bit of sick in your mouth on a Friday afternoon? This is for you.

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/i ... s-whos-who" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
By new puritan
Membership Days Posts
#355292
http://www.theguardian.com/politics/201 ... on-economy" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
David Cameron and George Osborne are increasingly regarded by the public as the best team to handle the British economy, a new poll suggests.

One in three believe the Tory leadership provides the best option for the country as it emerges out its economic downturn. This compares to just 18% who believe Ed Miliband and his shadow chancellor Ed Balls would be the best custodians of the economy - down 3 points on polling carried out last summer.

Just 7% said the Nick Clegg and business secretary Vince Cable were the ones they would trust the most with the economy. The remaining 30% said they would not put their trust in any of the leadership teams in the three mainstream political parties.

The Opinium/Observer poll will come as a major blow to Labour who last week sought to flesh out their economic vision.
Looks bad. But hang on - what's this?
Meanwhile Labour has dropped one percentage point over the last two weeks to 36% in the polls - just six points ahead of the Tories on 30%. The Liberal Democrats remain at 8%. Ukip is on 17%.
'Just six points'.
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