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By The Red Arrow
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#337725
Operation Tuleta: Reporter charged in computer probe
A former Sun newspaper reporter has become the first person to be charged under Operation Tuleta - a police investigation into alleged computer hacking and other privacy breaches.
Ben Ashford has been charged with one offence of possession of criminal property and one of unauthorised access to computer material.

He will appear before Westminster Magistrates' Court on 15 October.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-24332467" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
 
By Tubby Isaacs
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#340507
By all accounts, the Select Committee aren't getting much out of Leveson today. He's basically said "read the report". Very wary of getting identified too strongly with one side politically.

This has prompted the likes of Tim Shipman and Fraser Nelson to have kittens.
 
By The Red Arrow
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#340515
The Guardy's coverage includes this little gem...
Rupert Murdoch @rupertmurdoch

BBC massive taxpayer funded mouthpiece for tiny circulation leftist Guardian. Meanwhile print media about to be gagged to protect toffs.
12:29 AM - 7 Oct 2013
http://www.theguardian.com/media/2013/o ... ation-live" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
 
By Daley Mayle
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#343482
Whoop, whoop!

Press regulation: Papers lose Privy Council injunction bid
Newspaper publishers have lost a bid to stop ministers going to the Privy Council later to seek the Queen's approval for a royal charter on UK press regulation.

At the High Court, publishers argued the Privy Council had not considered their own proposed charter fairly.

But two judges refused them an injunction and said there were no grounds for a judicial review.

The publishers are considering a challenge to the Court of Appeal later.

Following the phone-hacking affair and subsequent Leveson Inquiry, politicians and the press drew up their own charters.

Both propose a "recognition panel" to oversee a press self-regulation committee with powers to impose fines of up to £1m on newspapers for wrongdoing.

The press charter would require industry-wide approval for any amendments, while the politicians' version - backed by the three mainstream parties - could be changed by a two-thirds majority in Parliament.

Some in the media claim this could let governments encroach on press freedom.

Hacked Off's executive director Brian Cathcart said: "The Royal Charter is good for journalism, good for freedom of speech, and - vitally - good for the public.

"What Mr Murdoch and his friends are clinging to is the right to lie, twist, bully and intrude, inflicting misery on innocent people. That has to stop."
Dacre will be in full vagina monologue mode!
 
By Messianic Trees
Membership Days Posts
#343528
Breaking news:
Former News of the World journalists Neville Thurlbeck, Greg Miskiw and James Weatherup and private investigator Glenn Mulcaire have pleaded guilty to phone-hacking charges, court hears.
Telegraph story here.
Last edited by Messianic Trees on Wed Oct 30, 2013 4:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
By Bones McCoy
Membership Days Posts
#343603
Daley Mayle wrote:Whoop, whoop!

Press regulation: Papers lose Privy Council injunction bid
Newspaper publishers have lost a bid to stop ministers going to the Privy Council later to seek the Queen's approval for a royal charter on UK press regulation.

At the High Court, publishers argued the Privy Council had not considered their own proposed charter fairly.

But two judges refused them an injunction and said there were no grounds for a judicial review.

The publishers are considering a challenge to the Court of Appeal later.

Following the phone-hacking affair and subsequent Leveson Inquiry, politicians and the press drew up their own charters.

Both propose a "recognition panel" to oversee a press self-regulation committee with powers to impose fines of up to £1m on newspapers for wrongdoing.

The press charter would require industry-wide approval for any amendments, while the politicians' version - backed by the three mainstream parties - could be changed by a two-thirds majority in Parliament.

Some in the media claim this could let governments encroach on press freedom.

Hacked Off's executive director Brian Cathcart said: "The Royal Charter is good for journalism, good for freedom of speech, and - vitally - good for the public.

"What Mr Murdoch and his friends are clinging to is the right to lie, twist, bully and intrude, inflicting misery on innocent people. That has to stop."
Dacre will be in full vagina monologue mode!
I was rather hoping they'd exercise their option of trial by combat.
 
By Bones McCoy
Membership Days Posts
#343604
Picklechu2 wrote:The 3 rogue reporters (but not the editor, oh no siree) maneuvre...
But all the time they were telling us it was one rogue reporter.

Couldn't even get that fact right.
 
By Malcolm Armsteen
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#343606
Bones McCoy wrote:

I was rather hoping they'd exercise their option of trial by combat.
As Murdoch wants us to revert to a feudal oligarchy, if they'd refused to plead we could have applied the peine forte et dure. Heavy weights laid on their chests until they either pled or died...
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