For other types of media
:sunglasses: 12.5 % :thumbsup: 12.5 % :grinning: 75 %
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#549935
Andy McDandy wrote:
Sun Jul 29, 2018 2:21 pm
When I was a teenager I'd race home from college to watch 15 to 1 and Countdown before flipping over to Byker Grurv ("Dooncan, ah'm blahnd and pregnant, man!") and was always intrigued by the ads, hearing aids, walk in baths and funeral plans. I think.it was Abers who pointed out that the ads you find in newspapers cover similar ground.
Back then, few "children", as in the 6-15 year demographic measured by BARB, had the disposable income to warrant TV expenditure. There were exceptions, Panini stickers and the like.

It rendered that airtime virtually worthless and brought about the American concept of P.I. - per inquiry (sic) - deals which were the forerunners to Direct Response TV. A few grandparents minding the kids after school was seen as as audience worth a wee punt, especially by advertisers who thought that they were way too smart to need an agency and who could be fobbed off with what the ITV contractors called "shoulder peak".

If ever called upon to run these campaigns - holiday cover and the like - I would always offer a tenner a spot, whether it was Thames or Border, and be done with it. They would usually bite. It wasn't worth anyone's time to do otherwise.
#550980
That advert for Aviva (Norwich Union) car insurance is starting to get on my tits.

You know, the one with the guy failing to describe a medieval role play bloke in a suit of armour chasing his horse across a road?

Mildly funny the first couple of times, but now I just think only a twat would describe that the way he does.
#550997
Back in the 1970s we had Harlech TV that was so feckin' dire that when it was broadcasting local content (rather than national commercial TV syndicated stuff like Corrie) media buying agencies weren't prepared to spend even a tenner a slot. They filled the advert breaks with government information adverts, like the one where a bit part actor (can't remember his name but he had a few minor parts in The Sweeney etc) would use three matches instead of a plug to connect his electric drill to the mains with tragic consequences. When I say tragic, I used to cheer every time I saw it.
#551005
Daley Mayle wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 9:01 am
They filled the advert breaks with government information adverts, like the one where a bit part actor (can't remember his name but he had a few minor parts in The Sweeney etc) would use three matches instead of a plug to connect his electric drill to the mains with tragic consequences. When I say tragic, I used to cheer every time I saw it.
Nick Brimble he also played Mrs Urquart's bodyguard fancy man in House of Cards.
Abernathy wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 9:05 am
I remember those little fillums. I particularly liked "Putting a rug on a polished floor? YOU MIGHT AS WELL SET A MAN TRAP..."


The Orwellian sounding Central Office of Information, who made PIFs, based their choices on accidents that were most frequent and on the rise. As opposed to our tabloid culture which creates fear from stuff that is statistically insignificant. I still recall a horror show at school about kids playing on farms mangled up under tractors and poisoning themselves. Top celebs employed for these films that children and their parents trusted included Rolf Harris, Alvin Stardust and Jimmy Savile.

These will bring back some memories


They even featured prototype Brexiters Joe & Petunia
#551011
youngian wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 9:34 am
Daley Mayle wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 9:01 am
They filled the advert breaks with government information adverts, like the one where a bit part actor (can't remember his name but he had a few minor parts in The Sweeney etc) would use three matches instead of a plug to connect his electric drill to the mains with tragic consequences. When I say tragic, I used to cheer every time I saw it.
Nick Brimble he also played Mrs Urquart's bodyguard fancy man in House of Cards.
Abernathy wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 9:05 am
I remember those little fillums. I particularly liked "Putting a rug on a polished floor? YOU MIGHT AS WELL SET A MAN TRAP..."


The Orwellian sounding Central Office of Information, who made PIFs, based their choices on accidents that were most frequent and on the rise. As opposed to our tabloid culture which creates fear from stuff that is statistically insignificant. I still recall a horror show at school about kids playing on farms mangled up under tractors and poisoning themselves.

I grew up in the country. Watched that film, or one very like it, aged 9 or 10.

I wouldn't go near a cow or anything remotely farm-like for weeks. Which was quite tricky, given the location.
youngian liked this
#551038
I knew someone who worked for the CoI...

I have in my collection a DVD called Charley Says... which is a collection of the PIFs. I recall they were often shown on the BBC (and occasionally, still are) usually at the end of transmission periods and before the test card/trade test films.
youngian liked this
#551043
cycloon wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 9:56 am
I grew up in the country. Watched that film, or one very like it, aged 9 or 10.

I wouldn't go near a cow or anything remotely farm-like for weeks. Which was quite tricky, given the location.
I would have taken up trainspotting but railway lines were a terrifying dystopia as well


Andy McDandy wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 10:39 am
Best point out that to anyone's knowledge, Alvin Stardust has never fiddled with da kidz.


This is true he just looked like the sort of stranger Charlie the Cat would advise against
#551046
youngian wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 12:13 pm
cycloon wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 9:56 am
I grew up in the country. Watched that film, or one very like it, aged 9 or 10.

I wouldn't go near a cow or anything remotely farm-like for weeks. Which was quite tricky, given the location.
I would have taken up trainspotting but railway lines were a terrifying dystopia as well
Nowadays I doubt it would have any impact, but what is of interest is that in the full 20 minute version posted elsewhere, one of the child actors pops up in the comments!


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-d ... e-45099112
#551061
Daley Mayle wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 9:01 am
Back in the 1970s we had Harlech TV that was so feckin' dire that when it was broadcasting local content (rather than national commercial TV syndicated stuff like Corrie) media buying agencies weren't prepared to spend even a tenner a slot. They filled the advert breaks with government information adverts, like the one where a bit part actor (can't remember his name but he had a few minor parts in The Sweeney etc) would use three matches instead of a plug to connect his electric drill to the mains with tragic consequences. When I say tragic, I used to cheer every time I saw it.
Iirc, not only did he improvise a plug from the matches, but he then managed to drill through the cable. In short, it was unlikely he was solving Fermat's last theorem of a weekend.
#551070
Andy McDandy wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 10:39 am
Best point out that to anyone's knowledge, Alvin Stardust has never fiddled with da kidz.
Was thinking that he never seemed to be linked whatsoever with Yewtree. Reminds me of a few years back reading some website which I've tried searching for but alas can't find that talked about the worst human beings in history that uttered probably the best sentence I've ever read... "Adolf Hitler, Josef Stalin, Tupac Shakur."
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