For other types of media
:sunglasses: 42.9 % :thumbsup: 19 % :grinning: 33.3 % 😟 4.8 %
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#563342
It's about time adverts dropped the 70s sitcom dim, hapless husband stereotype. Plumbs Furniture Covers have, or had, a series of ads for their sponsorship of ITV3 and the husband is portrayed as a dopey idiot dropping things he is trying to hang up and getting spoken to by his wife like he is a naughty child when he tries to sit down. Aldi, who'd you'd think were more "with it" being a modern supermarket, are no better. In the current ad, the female has booked her fella a gym membership with the money she says Aldi have saved her, quite clearly an unwanted gift judging by his reaction. This is after she has informed him of the month long vegan diet she has ordered him on, when he thought it was for a week. If the roles were reversed all this would have slightly sinister controlling behaviour overtones. For all the irritations of Alexa adverts, at least there was a refreshing moment in a recent one when Alexa tells the dad of a message left by his partner who had had a busy day with their baby that he was doing a great job. Mutual appreciation and a relationship of equals, rather than the Terry (from Terry and June) character that too many advert makers seem to think represent all men in the home.
#563348
Boiler wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 7:12 pm
Hasn't there been a recent Ofcom ruling to this effect?


I believe it was the Advertising Standards Authority.
#568031
Most of the high end perfume and aftershave ads because they are so pretentious and full of men or women looking moody and self-important. Unless featuring a Hollywood star like Julia Roberts, nobody ever smiles or speaks in these ads either. They just march ridiculously catwalk like in their own apartments or into doorstaff free nightclubs and dance with or embrace equally surly-looking strangers. It creates the impression they go home and shoot up heroin afterwards. It's as if the producers are using Kate Moss's 1990s lifestyle as a blueprint all potential customers can aspire to.
#569310
AOB wrote:
Sat Mar 02, 2019 8:25 am
Most of the high end perfume and aftershave ads because they are so pretentious and full of men or women looking moody and self-important. Unless featuring a Hollywood star like Julia Roberts, nobody ever smiles or speaks in these ads either. They just march ridiculously catwalk like in their own apartments or into doorstaff free nightclubs and dance with or embrace equally surly-looking strangers. It creates the impression they go home and shoot up heroin afterwards. It's as if the producers are using Kate Moss's 1990s lifestyle as a blueprint all potential customers can aspire to.
You might like this: https://twitter.com/perfumeads?lang=en
Lately I've been thinking that car adverts follow a similar template to perfume adverts (moody, pretentious, all about a feeling/lifestyle/image rather than the features of a product - especially adverts for expensive cars). Maybe it's because so many features of cars that used to be "extras" now come as standard, so it is hard to sell a car based on what it features and it has to be sold on its "personality" instead. There are some like the latest Jaguar advert which barely seem to feature the car at all!
AOB liked this
#569312
Advertising has long since moved on from "this product is useful", to "people you aspire to be like buy stuff like this".
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