Topics about the BBC
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By bluebellnutter
Membership Days Posts
#505625
Seems like a great way to endear yourself to the BBC and get your point across.
 
By Bones McCoy
Membership Days Posts
#507179
I've found the BBC has improved its act over the past week.

However this morning's report included. "Here's somebody form the Spectator to describe Jeremy Corbyn's speech to you all".

At no point were we permitted to hear Corbyn speaking, or even hear quotes form his speech.
It was simply 5 minutes of Spectator person telling us what she through and how Theresa's response was quite right.
 
By Daley Mayle
Membership Days Posts
#507193
On this week's Newswatch someone complained that although the GE campaign was suspended for a few days the Tories had gained some advantage because they were in Government and their leaders were given the majority of airtime discussing the Manchester bombing.

Someone needs to get out more.
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#507295
Andrew Neil‏ @afneil
In 2016 BA made hundreds of expert IT staff in UK redundant and outsourced the work to India.
Maybe they're good at their job at a competitive rate. I hear pro free market Indian current affairs presenters are excellent the BBC could save loads of money employing them.
 
By Daley Mayle
Membership Days Posts
#507298
BA blames a power cut, but a corporate IT expert said it should not have caused "even a flicker of the lights" in the data-centre.

Even if the power could not be restored, the airline's Disaster Recovery Plan should have whirred into action. But that will have depended in part on veteran staff with knowledge of the complex patchwork of systems built up over the years.

Many of those people may have left when much of the IT operation was outsourced to India.

One theory of the IT expert, who does not wish to be named, is that when the power came back on the systems were unusable because the data was unsynchronised.
Switch off and reboot always worked for me.
 
By Bones McCoy
Membership Days Posts
#507309
Daley Mayle wrote:
BA blames a power cut, but a corporate IT expert said it should not have caused "even a flicker of the lights" in the data-centre.

Even if the power could not be restored, the airline's Disaster Recovery Plan should have whirred into action. But that will have depended in part on veteran staff with knowledge of the complex patchwork of systems built up over the years.

Many of those people may have left when much of the IT operation was outsourced to India.

One theory of the IT expert, who does not wish to be named, is that when the power came back on the systems were unusable because the data was unsynchronised.
Switch off and reboot always worked for me.
These DR schemes are complex, and frequently require a little bit of "magic dust" from the staff who've been in place for years and know the systems like the back of their hands.
Outsourcing appears fine to the business school types who make the spending decisions, "I saved X millions per quarter" is a real feather in their caps.
It's usually done by accumulating what's known as "technical debt" - taking risks with the backroom stuff.

You could easily compare it to asking "Do we really need a co-pilot on these flights?" or "Do we really need all of those engines? why not switch half of them off until they're needed?"

I've been poking about the industry sites, and there appear to have been 5 significant outages this weekend all citing "Power issues".
I see two possibilities here.
Amateurish PR, a plausible default excuse when they're in deep shit and they don't know when it'll be fixed.
Multiple business cloud hosted at one big site (Not necessarily all of the incidents) - knowledgeable sources are suggesting Capita as a common factor for at least three of them.
 
By Andy McDandy
Membership Days Posts
#507688
BBC news take on tonight's debate - Corbyn changes mind at last minute to take part while nice Theresa at a nice country show says she's too busy.

Got to say, looks like the bias callers have a point.
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#521705
Good. What's the new project Conservative Home TV?

James Harding is to stand down as director of news and current affairs at the BBC and set up a media company that will offer “a clear point of view”, a perspective the impartial corporation is not allowed to provide.

The £340,000-a-year executive had been considered one of the frontrunners to eventually succeed Tony Hall as director general of the BBC, but his sudden departure leaves the director of radio, James Purnell, as the favourite.

Explaining his decision in a letter to staff, Harding wrote: “There is some journalism that the BBC, for all its brilliance, can’t, and probably shouldn’t, do. And that’s what I want to explore: I am going to start a new media company with a distinct approach to the news and a clear point of view.

“I know I will enjoy the chance to do some more journalism of my own and, at such a critical time, I’m seriously excited about the prospect of building a new venture in news.”

It is understood that Harding, who will leave the BBC early next year, has backers for his project and that it will focus on analysis rather than news. The 48-year-old joined the BBC in 2013, having left his previous role as editor of the Rupert Murdoch-owned Times newspaper the year before. https://www.theguardian.com/media/2017/ ... are_btn_tw" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
 
By Bones McCoy
Membership Days Posts
#521714
youngian wrote:Good. What's the new project Conservative Home TV?

James Harding is to stand down as director of news and current affairs at the BBC and set up a media company that will offer “a clear point of view”, a perspective the impartial corporation is not allowed to provide.

The £340,000-a-year executive had been considered one of the frontrunners to eventually succeed Tony Hall as director general of the BBC, but his sudden departure leaves the director of radio, James Purnell, as the favourite.

Explaining his decision in a letter to staff, Harding wrote: “There is some journalism that the BBC, for all its brilliance, can’t, and probably shouldn’t, do. And that’s what I want to explore: I am going to start a new media company with a distinct approach to the news and a clear point of view.

“I know I will enjoy the chance to do some more journalism of my own and, at such a critical time, I’m seriously excited about the prospect of building a new venture in news.”

It is understood that Harding, who will leave the BBC early next year, has backers for his project and that it will focus on analysis rather than news. The 48-year-old joined the BBC in 2013, having left his previous role as editor of the Rupert Murdoch-owned Times newspaper the year before. https://www.theguardian.com/media/2017/ ... are_btn_tw" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
The old adage that 'nobody ever really stops working for Murdoch' looks set to be proven again.
 
By Kreuzberger
Membership Days Posts
#521718
Bones McCoy wrote: The old adage that 'nobody ever really stops working for Murdoch' looks set to be proven again.
Thank you for squaring that circle as I considered what market (revenue stream) there might be for insight and features-based publishing from an introspective little rock which means far less to a global audience than would be enough to pay the bills.

As with Banks and his Westmonster, all manner of forces of darkness and their Breibart, these things can't thrive without a benefactor. Perhaps since that nice Missus Mensch twatted oceans of JRM's cash on Heat Street, he is looking for a safer pair of hands.
 
By Andy McDandy
Membership Days Posts
#521738
It used to be said of the old press magnates that nobody ran a newspaper expecting to make money. It's always been about the influence.
By MisterMuncher
Membership Days Posts
#524711
The BBC commissioned and funded a documentary by Alex Gibney on the Loughinisland massacre.

Gibney did his stuff, and produced a film that named names, dates, times, places.

BBC promptly disavowed and ignored.

Cheers.
 
By Arnold
Membership Days Posts
#526124
BBC use ‘independent’ organisation funded by Daily Mail and UK government as fact checkers
https://tompride.wordpress.com/2017/11/ ... -checkers/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
BBC uses ‘wrong’ clip on Newsnight of Jeremy Corbyn’s reply to budget
https://tompride.wordpress.com/2017/11/ ... to-budget/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

That's the BBC commonly portrayed as left wing.
 
By Cyclist
Membership Days Posts
#527514
This would be the same 'Left Wing'* BBC which finally admitted they'd shown the two pieces of footage of the Orgreave cavalry charge in the wrong order, thus ensuring the Tory lie that the coppers were reacting to provocation from the miners had traction for thirty fucking years.


* The right have always referred to the BBC as left-wing ever since Reith refused to broadcast Tory propaganda during the General Strike.
 
By Boiler
Posts
#527525
Cyclist wrote:* The right have always referred to the BBC as left-wing ever since Reith refused to broadcast Tory propaganda during the General Strike.
From http://www.bbc.co.uk/historyofthebbc/re ... ral-strike:
But there was the tiny British Broadcasting Company, forerunner to the BBC. The Conservative government had its own British Gazette, launched and edited by the Chancellor, Winston Churchill, but Churchill could see that radio was a more immediate and versatile medium in the chaos of the strike, and he lobbied Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin to commandeer the Company.
Basically, they never got over being told to fuck off by Reith.
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