Topics about the BBC
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#593650
TV was one of the many things fucked up in the 80s by Thatcher. It became a race to the bottom and the commercial stations which had produced some excellent stuff such as World in Action, The World at War etc became machines for churning out crap tabloid TV in the rush for ratings.

In typically hypocritical fashion too, Thatcher expressed support for Mary Whitehouse`s clean up TV campaign then deregulated broadcasting which allowed more filth than ever.
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By Boiler
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#593651
Andy McDandy wrote:
Fri Dec 20, 2019 4:26 pm
I recall reading that for Thames, losing their franchise was partly revenge for their "Death on the Rock" documentary.

Every now and again ITV will do a clip show along the lines of "Embarrassing stuff from yesteryear", with a subtext of "Ha ha, how regional". But I watched one and thought "you know, wasn't it nice when you had programming that knew and was aimed at its audience, and people took risks?".
The image of regional programming hasn't been helped by Steve bloody Coogan either. When we got our first ILR station back in around 1980, it genuinely used to have a segment at lunchtime on fat-stock prices, where you could find out how much 'baconers', 'cutters' and 'porkers' were selling for per pound (Trivia note: it was billed as bringing stereo radio to the area for the first time. I'm sure it was no coincidence the main BBC radio transmitter went stereo the day before the official launch).
#593656
mr angry manchester wrote:
Fri Dec 20, 2019 5:54 pm
TV was one of the many things fucked up in the 80s by Thatcher. It became a race to the bottom and the commercial stations which had produced some excellent stuff such as World in Action, The World at War etc became machines for churning out crap tabloid TV in the rush for ratings.

In typically hypocritical fashion too, Thatcher expressed support for Mary Whitehouse`s clean up TV campaign then deregulated broadcasting which allowed more filth than ever.

They fucked up on Ch4 thankfully. Tebbit collared Jeremy Isaac to tell him he’d got it all wrong by making programmes about homosexuals (only two had been made); ‘We thought you’d make programmes about golf.’
#593658
Boiler wrote:
Fri Dec 20, 2019 4:03 pm
I believe that even within the BBC the licence is viewed as the least worst funding option... but what could you replace it with given the current technology? Not everybody has, or wants, a bin lid screwed to the side of their house or has access to cable services and in some places, broadband struggles to get to 2Mb/sec even now.

How about a national broadband roll out all for free? That’s still a problem though. Easier to pay firms to finish the job rather than Jez’s complex approach.
#593664
Thatcher personally and expressly forbade upgrading the copper to fibre in, I think, around 1986. That decision was as unfathomable then as it is now. She was never challenged on it.

Perhaps, she wanted to keep the infrastructure close at hand but, within three years, Murdoch had launched Sky from somewhere 36,000km over Brazil. The rest, as they say, is recent history.

A word about quality programming in straightened times. The World Service has been gnawed to the bone but the quality, in my opinion has actually gone up. Guests for in depth discussions are cheap or free, the comms to draw contributors from the four corners cost zip also. Plus, there is a constant stream of young journalists, desperate to cut their teeth and earn some broadcast experience. Weekend (06:30 - 08:30 GMT) is, in this house, absolutely essential listening, as are the science and food strands, and anything with the honeyed tones of Helena Merriman such as The Enquiry, an hour's deep-dive on one specific current topic.

Of course, this has meant that we are cursed with thrusting young Turks like Chloe Tilley (who Speaks.With.Point.Less.Ly.Stressed.Sy.Lla.Bles) but, on the whole, I can recommend the World Service as a model for dedicated broadcasting. Public Service, if you will.



It is worth remembering too, that if the UK government fully pulls out, the likes of Al Jazeera could easily step in.
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#593668
Kreuzberger wrote:
Fri Dec 20, 2019 8:39 pm
Thatcher personally and expressly forbade upgrading the copper to fibre in, I think, around 1986. That decision was as unfathomable then as it is now. She was never challenged on it.
I didn't know that?
#593678
Boiler wrote:
Fri Dec 20, 2019 9:08 pm
Kreuzberger wrote:
Fri Dec 20, 2019 8:39 pm
Thatcher personally and expressly forbade upgrading the copper to fibre in, I think, around 1986. That decision was as unfathomable then as it is now. She was never challenged on it.
I didn't know that?
BT was the only carrier with the capacity to role it out so Thatcher and her barmy monetarist monks saw it as BT attempting a monopoly grab on the infrastructure. The US was also behind on fibre optic technology making it harder to open the market to US carriers like AT&T if BT’s upgrade continued.
 
By Boiler
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#593680
youngian wrote:
Fri Dec 20, 2019 7:58 pm
Boiler wrote:
Fri Dec 20, 2019 4:03 pm
I believe that even within the BBC the licence is viewed as the least worst funding option... but what could you replace it with given the current technology? Not everybody has, or wants, a bin lid screwed to the side of their house or has access to cable services and in some places, broadband struggles to get to 2Mb/sec even now.

How about a national broadband roll out all for free? That’s still a problem though. Easier to pay firms to finish the job rather than Jez’s complex approach.
Thing is, I live in the country and I don't expect it to be like living in a city, unlike many 'incomers' around here who complain about the smells and got the chimes/strikes of the church clock silenced, and campaigned for the street lights to be left on all night. So I don't expect gigabit broadband, nor do I expect a bus into town every five minutes all hours of the day, 24-hour shopping or a full five bars on my mobile at all times. I do expect peace and quiet though.

The thing is - an opportunity for future-proofing digital television was missed by leaving out CA modules in receivers. Is it possible to encrypt programming on the Freeview platform and unlock it with a PIN? Bit beyond my ken, that.
 
By Boiler
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#593681
youngian wrote:
Fri Dec 20, 2019 9:55 pm
BT was the only carrier with the capacity to role it out so Thatcher and her barmy monetarist monks saw it as BT attempting a monopoly grab on the infrastructure. The US was also behind on fibre optic technology making it harder to open the market to US carriers like AT&T if BT’s upgrade continued.
I vaguely remember it was Martlesham that developed fibre optics for telephony way ahead of everyone else - seem to recall reading snippets of it in Practical Wireless back in the late 70s.
 
By Boiler
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#593683
Thanks for that link, fascinating.

Jeeeesus... :roll:

So, once again screwed by dogma. A useful thing to remember next time some Tory bellyaches about BT and broadband and breaking it up.
#593686
Boiler wrote:
Fri Dec 20, 2019 9:58 pm
Thing is, I live in the country and I don't expect it to be like living in a city, unlike many 'incomers' around here who complain about the smells and got the chimes/strikes of the church clock silenced, and campaigned for the street lights to be left on all night.
The image of regional programming hasn't been helped by Steve bloody Coogan either.
Was that you who dumped the cow on Alan Partridge’s head?
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