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#575002
Places with good connections to London are of course famously impoverished. "Get rid of this awful Great Western Mainline thing", as the Leader of Reading Borough Council never stops saying.

Sheerman better hope Huddersfield doesn't get better links to Manchester and Liverpool. That'll be everybody out of his town.
#575018
The people of Kingston fought tooth and nail to prevent the London & Southampton railway running through their town in the 1840s, meaning the line had to be rerouted through a small nearby village named "Surbiton". I'm not saying it worked out well for Surbiton but the word "suburb" came from it...
#575023
bluebellnutter wrote:
Thu May 16, 2019 9:12 am
The people of Kingston fought tooth and nail to prevent the London & Southampton railway running through their town in the 1840s, meaning the line had to be rerouted through a small nearby village named "Surbiton". I'm not saying it worked out well for Surbiton but the word "suburb" came from it...
Not only that but the railway company pretty much bought all the land in Surbiton and *then* built the railway. It was essentially self funding.
#575041
bluebellnutter wrote:
Thu May 16, 2019 9:12 am
I'm not saying it worked out well for Surbiton but the word "suburb" came from it...
Oxford Etymological Dictionary wrote: suburb (n.)
early 14c., "area outside a town or city," whether agricultural or residential but most frequently residential, from Old French suburbe "suburb of a town," from Latin suburbium "an outlying part of a city" (especially Rome), from sub "below, near" (see sub-) + urbs (genitive urbis) "city" (see urban). Glossed in Old English as underburg. Just beyond the reach of municipal jurisdiction, suburbs had a bad reputation in 17c. England, especially those of London, and suburban had a sense of "inferior, debased, licentious" (as in suburban sinner, slang for "loose woman, prostitute"). By 1817, the tinge had shifted to "of inferior manners and narrow views." Compare also French equivalent faubourg.
'Surbiton' came from suburb, not the other way round.
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