Topics about the BBC
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By Andy McDandy
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#349201
Ian Hyland made several similar points in the Mirror today.

I disagree slightly on the Savile episode. They did the best they could and turned the spotlight on the hypocrisy of the rest of the media. But just compare it to the Daily Show - every weeknight for an hour, sharp as a knife.

But as we've said, it's become cosy comfort food.
 
By Samanfur
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#349252
There's a lot of it about, though. There's no equivalent to Spitting Image today, and when did you last see anything from Rory Bremner or The Two Johns? With the exception of The Revolution Will Be Televised and most things involving Charlie Brooker, it feels as though satire on TV in general - never mind the BBC - has largely been neutered.
 
By The Weeping Angel
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#349254
Samanfur wrote:There's a lot of it about, though. There's no equivalent to Spitting Image today, and when did you last see anything from Rory Bremner or The Two Johns? With the exception of The Revolution Will Be Televised and most things involving Charlie Brooker, it feels as though satire on TV in general - never mind the BBC - has largely been neutered.
A worrying situation indeed how did it come to this?
 
By Samanfur
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#349258
I'm winding down for bed, so for now I'll keep my theory down to three words:

Lowest.

Common.

Denominator.

There's no money or viewing figures in either turning people (be they viewers or advertisers) off your programming with your ideology, and heavens forbid you put potential off by even suggesting that they might not be informed enough to get the joke. It's far easier to go down the "entertain" route with the A/V equivalent of rice pudding than it is to "inform" or "educate".
By Andy McDandy
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#349282
Longer post to follow.

It's the fate of perhaps every satirist to be adopted by the society they're lampooning. Spitting Image outraged people when it was launched - by the end, public figures were appalled if they hadn't got a puppet likeness. It was a sign that they had 'arrived'.

As for the programme model, more later.
 
By Samanfur
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#349325
The problem with the system of "hidden norms" is that most shows claiming to rebel will implicitly acknowledge the narrative, in order to push back in exactly the opposite manner. And if you succeed and change the norm, you're just setting yourself up as the next thing to be lampooned or knocked over. The Two Ronnies and The Good Life found it out in the '70s when the likes of Python and The Young Ones arrived, the Pythons're finding it out now, and there'll be something else along in a minute.
By Andy McDandy
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#349336
The interesting thing being that there was probably a harder edge and more 'reality' in The Good Life or The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin than in many modern sitcoms. Miranda, Not Going Out - they're stuck in a sort of nebulous warp space bearing no resemblance to reality at all. They can't appeal to your Inbetweeners audience, and really seem to be loose structures to hang jokes on. Whenever they touch on more 'adult' matter (take for example the Not Going Out episode with the porn film), they're so hamstrung by the plot and the medium (time slot and channel) that the result comes across as looking incredibly prissy and dancing round the subject matter.

Yes, I agree that it's the fate of all iconoclasts to eventually become part of the establishment they're railing against - that or exit stage left a bit early. People get older, subconsciously self-edit (see Amanda Platell recently, holding up Python as an example of 'good clean fun' comedy, clearly missing all the F-strikes, over the top violence and nudity and just remembering the silly walks), and let the nostalgia filter slip into place.

I read something on Cracked that said (this was in relation to films, but it applied equally to TV) that part of the problem was that commissioning editors increasingly view programmes as a vehicle. Star X is popular, so let's find something for them to do. So scripts get tailored to the star, rather than 'Here's a good script, let's find someone to star in it'.
 
By Oblomov
#593177
AOB wrote:
Sun Dec 15, 2019 9:14 am


"The majority of voters..."

And they have a hissy fit when they're called "thick".
HIGNFY is pretty much the sole reason my dad thinks the BBC is still a hive of lefties these days. He catches it whilst channel-hopping, gives it 5 minutes because of nostalgia, sees a fairly toothless jibe at someone in government and then he clicks off muttering something about the "British Broadcasting Communists" :roll:

I can't remember if I found it on here but I read an article containing a thought experiment that posited that if Angus Daeyton hadn't been sacked, Bozza may well have never had his meteoric rise. A fun little piece but who knows what the effect of the internet, especially post-2014 would have had.
AOB, hel liked this
 
By Boiler
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#593256
Well, its charter runs to 2027 but decriminalisation of the licence fee is expected to lose it in the region of £200 million. The Mail is expecting the whole of the 20s to be a Tory administration. I can definitely not see a charter renewal in '27. Add to that pressure to meet the over-75s licences in full and I can see the BBC being little more than BBC 1 and Radio 4 by 2027.
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