Political talk from outside of the UK
:sunglasses: 29.3 % ❤ 3.4 % :thumbsup: 29.3 % 😯 5.2 % :grinning: 12.1 % 🙏 3.4 % 😟 10.3 % :cry: 6.9 %
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By Tubby Isaacs
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#618944
Andy McDandy wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 8:56 am
Alaska and Montana are serious headbanger hard Republican states. Rugged individualism and code of the west. Iowa however, Trump losing there would be like Leamington Spa voting Labour.
Montana's a funny. Deep Red for Presidential elections, but has 1 Democrat Senator, and a Democrat Governor. It's possible for Democrats to win there if they have a good public image and make it clear they're not going to regulate guns too much. Some of the standard Republican stuff, like abortion, doesn't have the resonance it does elsewhere.
 
By youngian
Membership Days Posts
#619312
This is funny if correct
Donald Trump just set the stage for President Pelosi
Donald Trump is trying to scare us into thinking he can postpone the election with a wave of his evil wand. We are supposed to tremble believing that if we cannot vote, we must accept a second term of Trump by default. As it turns out, the only person who should be scared by Trump’s threat is Trump himself. If no election is held by Inauguration Day, not only will Trump be out of office, but Joe Biden could legally replace him.
In an intriguing piece published Friday by Politico, law professor Richard Primus explained how applying the rules of succession to such a highly unusual scenario would work. The first thing to keep in mind is that the Trump-Pence ticket was elected in 2016 for a four-year term. Whether or not there is another election, that term ends on January 20, 2021, with the incumbents having no special claim to remain in power.
If Trump and Pence cannot stay in office on January 20 because there is no election, the rules of succession tell us that the next in line to the presidency is the Speaker of the House. Although Nancy Pelosi currently holds that role, no elections would mean she and every other member of the House of Representatives would be out of a job as of January 3, leaving the speakership vacant on January 20.
Now comes the truly weird part, which relies on the political makeup of the Senate on Inauguration Day. Although there are currently 100 senators, 65 seats are not up for election. So, if no elections are held, the Senate would continue beyond January 3 but with only 65 members. Although Democrats are currently in the minority, they would then occupy 35 of those 65 seats, automatically gaining the majority in time for January 20. https://www.palmerreport.com/analysis/p ... for/31217/
 
By Tubby Isaacs
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#619563
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/202 ... dment.html

Missouri votes to expand Medicaid! 53 v 47.

I don't know if the governor (who opposed) can muck about not funding it or anything like that- this is what happened in Maine when the electorate voted for it over the governor's head. But he's up for re-election in Novemember, and I assume he'll be put under a lot of pressure on this score.
 
By Tubby Isaacs
Membership Days Membership Days Posts
#619590
Talking of the Missouri Governor election, the incumbent Republican (Mike Parsons) remains favourite. But latest poll was close (41-39 lead over Democrat Nicole Galloway. Missouri wasn't as badly affected as some in the first "wave" of Coronavirus, but lots of cases now. Over 1,300 new cases announced yesterday, 22 deaths, out of a population of 6.14m. Multiply those by about 11 to get an idea of UK equivalent.

Could be close, but you'd expect Trump to get Parsons over the line.
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