:sunglasses: 50 % :pray: 10 % :laughing: 20 % :🤗 20 %
User avatar
By Boiler
#10619
Youngian wrote: Thu Sep 23, 2021 9:05 pm Perhaps Kermit the Frog could deliver the petrol
You will get many people say "but the driver shortage is Europe-wide so this has nowt to do with Brexit".

Yesterday I pulled into a filling station to fill the tank (these days I find I can get about 500 miles from a tankfull) and noticed all the diesel nozzles were covered. Cashier said "We've had no diesel deliveries".

Now, I'm led to believe that tanker drivers are certified differently to say, someone with a curtain-side trailer: same goes for loose powders. So the question is this: where have all the tanker drivers suddenly gone? After all, you must need a certain skill set to safely deliver several thousand gallons of highly volatile liquid...? Think about going round a roundabout and all that liquid wanting to keep moving in a different direction.
User avatar
By Andy McDandy
#10620
Same here yesterday when filling up. Almost. The regular diesel was switched off, but the V-Power super dooper expensive was available. Whether that's because nobody usually buys it, or someone just decided to make a few quid, I don't know.

Meanwhile, Asda and Tesco in Liverpool South are running normally, but big gaps at Tesco in Barrow. Booths*, as ever, full to the brim.

*North western Waitrose equivalent, with much local sourcing.
By Youngian
#10625
A tanker driver on FiveLive explained that you need a Petroleum Driver Passport (PDP) which has to be taken every five years but you have to be working in the sector to take it. As you can earn more with less hassle working for a supermarket, there’s been haemorrhaging for years and no incentives to attract replacements. As usual Brexit isn’t the systemic cause but the kick in the bollocks that takes you down.
By Bones McCoy
#10627
Boiler wrote: Fri Sep 24, 2021 12:09 am
Youngian wrote: Thu Sep 23, 2021 9:05 pm Perhaps Kermit the Frog could deliver the petrol
You will get many people say "but the driver shortage is Europe-wide so this has nowt to do with Brexit".

Yesterday I pulled into a filling station to fill the tank (these days I find I can get about 500 miles from a tankfull) and noticed all the diesel nozzles were covered. Cashier said "We've had no diesel deliveries".

Now, I'm led to believe that tanker drivers are certified differently to say, someone with a curtain-side trailer: same goes for loose powders. So the question is this: where have all the tanker drivers suddenly gone? After all, you must need a certain skill set to safely deliver several thousand gallons of highly volatile liquid...? Think about going round a roundabout and all that liquid wanting to keep moving in a different direction.
Sorry to hijack, but you got me thinking there, the free surface effect... Liquid sloshing about in a partially filled container.
Very dangerous on ships, where the problem is addressed through compartmentalisation and counter-flooding.
I wonder whether the tank on the back of the lorry is also compartmentlised.
User avatar
By Cyclist
#10637
What happens when tanks aren't baffled


The Sevenoaks railway accident occurred on 24 August 1927 between Dunton Green railway station and Sevenoaks railway station. The Southern Railway's afternoon express from Cannon Street to Deal left London at 5pm, hauled by River Class tank engine No 800 River Cray. Several passengers later recounted that from time to time the train seemed to roll excessively on fast curves. As it passed through Pollhill Tunnel at 60 mph the rocking became violent and the train derailed past Dunton Green railway station. Unfortunately, the line at that point is in a cutting which is spanned by a bridge carrying Shoreham Lane. The cab of the locomotive struck the bridge and the engine was turned on its side across the cutting. The leading coaches piled up against it, killing 13 and injuring many more. Railway engineer Brigadier-General Archibald Jack was a survivor of the crash.

John Wallace Pringle, Chief Inspecting Officer of Her Majesty's Railway Inspectorate conducted the inquiry in person.[1] Following the accident, the Southern Railway withdrew all the remaining 'River' class tank engines, which caused a public sensation at the time. Other drivers testified about the instability of the class and it emerged that one locomotive had previously derailed at speed, though it had miraculously re-railed itself. The engines' high centre of gravity, their hard springing, and the tendency for the water in the side tanks to surge, all caused the engines to roll dangerously at speed, so much so that in this accident the nearside wheels had lifted.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sevenoaks ... y_accident
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